July 28, 2013

Forgotten Language

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--Description: 20th C, Silverstein S., Nature, Childhood--


Once I spoke the language of the flowers,
Once I understood each word the caterpillar said,
Once I smiled in secret at the gossip of the starlings,
And shared a conversation with the housefly
in my bed.
Once I heard and answered all the questions
of the crickets,
And joined the crying of each falling dying
flake of snow,
Once I spoke the language of the flowers. . . .
How did it go?
How did it go?


Shel Silverstein

--Did You Know: Shel Silverstein was an American poet, songwriter, musician, composer, cartoonist, screenwriter, and author of children's books. He sometimes styled himself as Uncle Shelby, especially for his early children's books. Silverstein confirmed he never studied the poetry of others therefore, developed his own quirky style: laid-back and conversational, occasionally employing profanity and slang.

--Word of the Day: edacity \ih-DAS-i-tee\, noun:
the state of being edacious; voraciousness; appetite.
Example:
Craving can be defined as a compelling and overwhelming edacity for a particular substance.
-- Robert T. Ammerman, Peggy J. Ott, and Ralph E. Tarter, Prevention and Societal Impact of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 1999

--Quote of the Day: Pleasure is the flower that passes; remembrance, the lasting perfume. ~Jean de Boufflers

--Language Arts-ITALIAN: facile: easy
Example sentence: I primi 20 esercizi sono i più facili; gli altri sono abbastanza difficili.
Translation: The first 20 exercises are the easiest ones; the others are pretty hard.


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July 14, 2013

Spring Wind in London

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--Description: 20th C, Mansfield K., Nature, Seasons--


I blow across the stagnant world,
I blow across the sea,
For me, the sailor's flag unfurled,
For me, the uprooted tree.
My challenge to the world is hurled;
The world must bow to me.

I drive the clouds across the sky,
I huddle them like sheep;
Merciless shepherd-dog am I
And shepherd-watch I keep.
If in the quiet vales they lie
I blow them up the steep.

Lo! In the tree-tops do I hide,
In every living thing;
On the moon's yellow wings I glide,
On the wild rose I swing;
On the sea-horse's back I ride,
And what then do I bring?

And when a little child is ill
I pause, and with my hand
I wave the window curtain's frill
That he may understand
Outside the wind is blowing still;
...It is a pleasant land.

O stranger in a foreign place,
See what I bring to you.
This rain--is tears upon your face;
I tell you--tell you true
I came from that forgotten place
Where once the wattle grew,--

All the wild sweetness of the flower
Tangled against the wall.
It was that magic, silent hour....
The branches grew so tall
They twined themselves into a bower.
The sun shown... and the fall

Of yellow blossom on the grass!
You feel that golden rain?
Both of you could not hold, alas,
(both of you tried, in vain)
A memory, stranger. So I pass....
It will not come again


Katherine Mansfield

--Did You Know: (14 October 1888 – 9 January 1923) Katherine Mansfield was a prominent modernist writer of short fiction who was born and brought up in colonial New Zealand, and wrote under the pen name of Katherine Mansfield, which is in itself a short form of her real name as she was born Katherine Mansfield Beauchamp. Mansfield left for Great Britain in 1908 where she encountered Modernist writers such as D.H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf with whom she became close friends. Her stories often focus on moments of disruption and frequently open rather abruptly. Among her most well known stories are The Garden Party, The Daughters of the Late Colonel and The Fly. Mansfield contracted tuberculosis which rendered any return or visit to New Zealand impossible and led to her death at the age of 34.

--Word of the Day: conflate \kuhn-FLAYT\, transitive verb:
1. To bring together; to fuse together; to join or meld.
2. To combine (as two readings of a text) into one whole.
Example:
Scott Reynolds's creepy debut feature [film] conflates the present and the past with ingenious use of flashbacks.
-Anne Billson, "Bent beneath the weight of its own righteousness", Sunday Telegraph, March 1, 1998

--Quote of the Day: Alas for those that never sing,
But die with all their music in them!
~Oliver Wendell Holmes

--Language Arts-FRENCH:
French word: employé de bureau
English translation: office worker
Part of speech: noun

French example: Il est employé de bureau chez IBM.
English example: He is an office employee at IBM.


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July 7, 2013

Delight in Disorder

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--Description: 17th C, Herrick R., Love, Sonnet--



A sweet disorder in the dress
Kindles in clothes a wantonness:
A lawn about the shoulders thrown
Into a fine distraction:
An erring lace, which here and there
Enthralls the crimson stomacher:
A cuff neglectful, and thereby
Ribbands to flow confusedly:
A winning wave (deserving note)
In the tempestuous petticoat:
A careless shoe-string, in whose tie
I see a wild civility:
Do more bewitch me, than when art
Is too precise in every part.



Robert Herrick

--Did You Know: (baptized 24 August 1591 – buried 15 October 1674)Herrick was a 17th century English poet. Born in Cheapside, London, he was the seventh child and fourth son of Nicholas Herrick, a prosperous goldsmith, who fell out of a window when Robert was a year old (whether this was suicide remains unclear). The tradition that Herrick received his education at Westminster is groundless. It is more likely that (like his uncle's children) he attended The Merchant Taylors' School. In 1607 he became apprenticed to his uncle, Sir William Herrick, who was a goldsmith and jeweler to the king. The apprenticeship ended after only six years when Herrick, at age twenty-two, matriculated at St John's College, Cambridge. He graduated in 1617. Robert Herrick became a member of the Sons of Ben, a group centered upon an admiration for the works of Ben Jonson. The Victorian poet Swinburne described Herrick as the greatest song writer...ever born of English race. It is certainly true that despite his use of classical allusions and names, his poems are easier for modern readers to understand than those of many of his contemporaries.

--Word of the Day: falcate \FAL-keyt\, adjective:
curved like a scythe or sickle; hooked; falciform.
Example:
...Mario did the choreography and most of the puppet-work personally—his little S-shaped arms and falcate digits are perfect for the forward curve from body to snout of a standard big-headed political puppet...
-- David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest, 1996

--Quote of the Day: Pull the string, and it will follow wherever you wish.
Push it, and it will go nowhere at all.
- Dwight D. Eisenhower

--Language Arts: barrio, noun
neighborhood; district
- Barrio is a Spanish word meaning neighborhood, or district. Many of the people living in a Spanish barrio know each other and share the same church, shops, traditions and feast days, which unite them as a community.
Despite the associations of the word as often used today in the United States, a barrio is not necessarily a poor district.
Some common phrases including barrio are:
Example:
Ese chico no es del barrio.
That boy’s not from this neighborhood.

* Please also visit fellow poets on our: ~ Current Guest Poet's Page ~
Current Poet: Catherine Broughton Current Poem: The Child

** Please also visit fellow poets on our ~ Current Guest Poet's Page ~ .

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. Subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter and Facebook.. We are also found on Pinterest and Google+.

Poets and Advertisers-please contact us to post your press releases, new book info, graphics and more at: coffeetablepoet@gmail.com

~ Note: If you have an iPhone or iPad, surf over to Cool iPhone, iPad Apps to find fun, productive & useful apps and news.

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