June 29, 2013

Dreams

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--Description: 17th C, Dryden J., Celestial, Dreams, Night-- 



 
Dreams are but interludes which Fancy makes;
When monarch Reason sleeps, this mimic wakes:
Compounds a medley of disjointed things,
A mob of cobblers, and a court of kings:
Light fumes are merry, grosser fumes are sad;
Both are the reasonable soul run mad;
And many monstrous forms in sleep we see,
That neither were, nor are, nor e'er can be.
Sometimes forgotten things long cast behind
Rush forward in the brain, and come to mind.
The nurse's legends are for truths received,
And the man dreams but what the boy believed.
Sometimes we but rehearse a former play,
The night restores our actions done by day;
As hounds in sleep will open for their prey.
In short, the farce of dreams is of a piece,
Chimeras all; and more absurd, or less.


John Dryden

--Did You Know: (9 August 1631 – 1 May 1700)  John Dryden was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles as the Age of Dryden. Walter Scott named him "Glorious John." After the Restoration, Dryden quickly established himself as the leading poet and literary critic of his day and he transferred his allegiances to the new government. Along with Astraea Redux, Dryden welcomed the new regime with two more panegyrics; To His Sacred Majesty: A Panegyric on his Coronation (1662), and To My Lord Chancellor (1662). These poems suggest that Dryden was looking to court a possible patron, but he was to instead make a living in writing for publishers, not for the aristocracy, and thus ultimately for the reading public. Read more at: John Dryden

--Poetry Terminology: Feminine Ending -
Line of verse with an extra unstressed syllable at the end.

--Word of the Day: sward \swawrd\, noun:
1. the grassy surface of land; turf.
2. a stretch of turf; a growth of grass.
verb:
1. to cover with sward or turf.
2. to become covered with sward.
Exampe:
One fair half-day in the July of 1800, by good luck, he was employed, partly out of charity, by one of the keepers, to trim the sward in an oval enclosure within St. James' Park...
-- Herman Melville, Israel Potter, 1855

--Quote of the Day:
In my own deepening understanding of myself
I find my capacity to serve others is deepened as well.
The better I am at self-care
the more genuinely nurturing of others I am able to be.
- Mary Anne Radmacher

--Language Arts-ITALIAN: stradale: road / adjective
Example sentence: I cartelli stradali non erano chiari e ci siamo persi.
Translation: The road signs weren't clear so we got lost.

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Current Poem: My mother 1918-2010

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June 16, 2013

1723

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-- 19th C, Dickinson E., Children, Life, Nature, Parenting --


High from the earth I heard a bird;
He trod upon the trees
As he esteemed them trifles,
And then he spied a breeze,
And situated softly
Upon a pile of wind
Which in a perturbation
Nature had left behind.
A joyous-going fellow
I gathered from his talk,
Which both of benediction
And badinage partook,
Without apparent burden,
I learned, in leafy wood
He was the faithful father
Of a dependent brood;
And this untoward transport
His remedy for care,—
A contrast to our respites.
How different we are!



Emily Dickinson

--Did You Know: (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) Emily Dickinson was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After she studied at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence. Although Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation. Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring topics in letters to her friends.

--Word of the Day: trachle \TRAH-khuh\, noun:
1. an exhausting effort, especially walking or working.
2. an exhausted or bedraggled person.
Example:
verb:
1. to fatigue; tire; wear out.
2. to bedraggle.

"It's getting a sore trachle up thae bits o' braes you have about Craigie. I'm no' so young as I used to be."
-- James Barke, The Wind That Shakes the Barley, 1946

--Quote of the Day: There's something like a line of gold thread running through a man's words when he talks to his daughter, and gradually over the years it gets to be long enough for you to pick up in your hands and weave into a cloth that feels like love itself. ~John Gregory Brown, Decorations in a Ruined Cemetery, 1994

--Language Arts-ITALIAN: comprendere: to include / verb
Example sentence: La lista comprenderà i nomi di tutti i vincitori
Translation: The list will include the names of all the winners.


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June 11, 2013

An Apology

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--Description: 17th C, Bradstreet A., Life, Perseverance--



To finish what's begun, was my intent,
My thoughts and my endeavours thereto bent;
Essays I many made but still gave out,
The more I mus'd, the more I was in doubt:
The subject large my mind and body weak,
With many moe discouragements did speak.
All thoughts of further progress laid aside,
Though oft perswaded, I as oft deny'd,
At length resolv'd, when many years had past,
To prosecute my story to the last;
And for the same, I hours not few did spend,
And weary lines (though lanke) I many pen'd:
But 'fore I could accomplish my desire,
My papers fell a prey to th'raging fire.
And thus my pains (with better things) I lost,
Which none had cause to wail, nor I to boast.
No more I'le do sith I have suffer'd wrack,
Although my Monarchies their legs do lack:
Nor matter is't this last, the world now sees,
Hath many Ages been upon his knees.



Anne Bradstreet


--Did You Know: (c. 1612 – September 16, 1672) Anne Bradstreet was New England's first published poet. Her work met with a positive reception in both the Old World and the New World. Bradstreet was born Anne Dudley in Northampton, England, 1612. She was the daughter of Thomas Dudley, a steward of the Earl of Lincoln, and Dorothy Yorke. Due to her family's position she grew up in cultured circumstances and was a well-educated woman for her time, being tutored in history, several languages and literature. At the age of sixteen she married Simon Bradstreet. Both Anne's father and husband were later to serve as governors of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Anne and Simon, along with Anne's parents, immigrated to America aboard the Arbella as part of the Winthrop Fleet of Puritan emigrants in 1630. Bradstreet's education gave her advantages to write with authority about politics, history, medicine, and theology. Her personal library of books was said to have numbered over 800, before many were destroyed when her home burned down. This event itself inspired a poem entitled "Upon the Burning of Our House July 10th, 1666". She rejects the anger and grief that this worldly tragedy has caused her and instead looks toward God. Read more at: Anne Bradstreet.

--Word of the Day: automaton \aw-TOM-uh-ton, -tn\, noun:
1. a mechanical figure or contrivance constructed to act as if by its own motive power; robot.
2. a person or animal that acts in a monotonous, routine manner, without active intelligence.
3. something capable of acting automatically or without an external motive force.
Example:
That this is so is evident from the fact that some apprentices as early as their thirteenth year are able to construct an automaton whose motions are anatomically flawless.
-- Steven Millhauser, "The New Automaton Theater," The Knife Thrower: and Other Stories, 1998

--Quote of the Day: The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
~Marcel Proust

--Language Arts: French word: augmentation - English translation: raise
Part of speech: noun

French example: Il va demander une augmentation à son chef pour la nouvelle année.
English example: He's going to ask his boss for a raise for the new year.


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June 7, 2013

My young son asks me...

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--Description: 20th C, Brecht B., Children, Humanity, Life, Parenting--



My young son asks me: Must I learn mathematics?
What is the use, I feel like saying. That two pieces
Of bread are more than one's about all you'll end up with.
My young son asks me: Must I learn French?
What is the use, I feel like saying. This State's collapsing.
And if you just rub your belly with your hand and
Groan, you'll be understood with little trouble.
My young son asks me: Must I learn history?
What is the use, I feel like saying. Learn to stick
Your head in the earth, and maybe you'll still survive.

Yes, learn mathematics, I tell him.
Learn your French, learn your history!



Bertolt Brecht

--Did You Know: Bertolt Brecht (10 February 1898 – 14 August 1956) Brecht was a German poet, playwright, and theatre director. An influential theatre practitioner of the 20th century, Brecht made equally significant contributions to dramaturgy and theatrical production, the latter particularly through the huge impact of the tours undertaken by the Berliner Ensemble – the post-war theatre company operated by Brecht and his wife, long-time collaborator and actress Helene Weigel. Bertolt Brecht was born in Augsburg, Bavaria (about 80 km/50 mi north-west of Munich), to a devout Protestant mother and a Catholic father (who had been persuaded to have a Protestant wedding). The modest house where he was born is today preserved as a Brecht Museum.

--Word of the Day: bibelot \BIB-loh; Fr. beebuh-LOH\, noun:
a small object of curiosity, beauty, or rarity.
Example:
And in the meanwhile she was tasting what, she begun to suspect, was the maximum of bliss to most of the women she knew: days packed with engagements, the exhilaration of fashionable crowds, the thrill of snapping up a jewel or a bibelot or a new "model" that one's best friend wanted, or of being invited to some private show, or some exclusive entertainment, that one's best friend couldn't get to.
-- Edith Wharton, The Glimpses of the Moon, 1922

--Quote of the Day: I love my father as the stars — he's a bright shining example and a happy twinkling in my heart. ~Terri Guillemets

* Please also visit fellow poets on our: ~ Current Guest Poet's Page ~
Current Poet: Steven Taylor
Current Poem: I Trust You Father


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June 1, 2013

Mother Nature

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--Description: 20th C, MacDonald G., Children, Contentment, Love, Nature, Parenting--



Beautiful mother is busy all day,
So busy she neither can sing nor say;
But lovely thoughts, in a ceaseless flow,
Through her eyes, and her ears, and her bosom go-
Motion, sight, and sound, and scent,
Weaving a royal, rich content.

When night is come, and her children sleep,
Beautiful mother her watch doth keep;
With glowing stars in her dusky hair
Down she sits to her music rare;
And her instrument that never fails,
Is the hearts and the throats of her nightingales.


George MacDonald

--Did You Know: (10 December 1824 – 18 September 1905) George MacDonald was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. Known particularly for his poignant fairy tales and fantasy novels, George MacDonald inspired many authors, such as W. H. Auden, J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, E. Nesbit and Madeleine L'Engle. It was C.S. Lewis who wrote that he regarded MacDonald as his "master": "Picking up a copy of Phantastes one day at a train-station bookstall, I began to read. A few hours later," said Lewis, "I knew that I had crossed a great frontier." G. K. Chesterton cited The Princess and the Goblin as a book that had "made a difference to my whole existence." Read more at: George MacDonald

--Word of the Day: genethliac \juh-NETH-lee-ak\, adjective:
of or pertaining to birthdays or to the position of the stars at one's birth.
Example:
Really it must be admitted that only in England and America is there anybody who knows how to establish the genethliac theme and construct a horoscope.
-- J. K. Huysmans, translated by Keene Wallace, Down There, 1891

--Quote of the Day: It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor.
- Lucius Annaeus Seneca

--Language Arts-ITALIAN: girare: to turn - verb
Example sentence: Per arrivare al museo deve girare a sinistra al prossimo semaforo.
Translation: To get to the museum you have to turn left at the next stoplight.


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Current Poem: Seasons of My Soul

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