April 29, 2013

Love One Another

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--Description: 20th C, Gibran K., Love, Peace--




Love one another, but make not a bond of love.
Let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.
Fill each other's cup, but drink not from one cup.
Give one another of your bread, but eat not from the same loaf.
Sing and dance together and be joyous, but let each one of you be alone.
Even as the strings of a lute are alone though they quiver with the same music.
Give your hearts, but not into each other's keeping.
For only the hand of life can contain your hearts.
And stand together, yet not too near together.
For the pillars of the temple stand apart.
And the oak tree and the cypress grow not in each other's shadow.


Khalil Gibran


--Did You Know: (January 6, 1883 – April 10, 1931) Gibran was a Lebanese American artist, poet, and writer. Born in the town of Bsharri in modern-day Lebanon, as a young man he emigrated with his family to the United States where he studied art and began his literary career. He is chiefly known for his 1923 book The Prophet, a series of philosophical essays written in English prose. An early example of Inspirational fiction, the book sold well despite a cool critical reception, and became extremely popular in 1960s counterculture. Gibran was born in the Christian Maronite town of Bsharri (in modern day northern Lebanon) to the daughter of a Maronite Catholic priest. His mother Kamila was thirty when he was born; his father, also named Khalil, was her third husband. As a result of his family's poverty, Gibran received no formal schooling during his youth. However, priests visited him regularly and taught him about the Bible, as well as the Arabic and Syriac languages.

--Word of the Day: percipient \per-SIP-ee-uhnt\, adjective:
1. having perception; discerning; discriminating: a percipient choice of wines.
2. perceiving or capable of perceiving.
noun:
1. a person or thing that perceives.
Example:
"You're more percipient than you look," she said with a grin. "And percipient enough not to use that word instead of perceptive, which is what it really means."
-- Carolyne Aarsen, Love Is Patient and A Heart's Refuge, 2010

--Quote of the Day: If you see ten troubles coming down the road,
you can be sure that nine will run into the ditch before they reach you.
- Calvin Coolidge

--Language Arts: bicchiere: (drinking) glass / noun
Example sentence: In quel locale servono la birra in bicchieri di plastica.
Translation: In that pub they serve beer in plastic glasses.


* Please also visit fellow poets on our: ~ Current Guest Poet's Page ~
Current Poet: Catherine Broughton
Current Poem: She left



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April 21, 2013

Two Streams

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--Description: 19th C, Holmes O.W., Aging, Life-- 
BEHOLD the rocky wall
That down its sloping sides
Pours the swift rain-drops, blending as they fall,
In rushing river-tides!

Yon stream, whose sources run
Turned by a pebble's edge,
Is Athabasca, rolling toward the sun
Through the cleft mountain-ledge.

The slender rill had strayed,
But for the slanting stone,
To evening's ocean, with the tangled braid
Of foam-flecked Oregon.

So from the heights of Will
Life's parting stream descends,
And, as a moment turns its slender rill,
Each widening torrent bends,--

From the same cradle's side,
From the same mother's knee,--
One to long darkness and the frozen tide,
One to the Peaceful Sea!


Oliver Wendell Holmes

--Did You Know: (August 29, 1809 – October 7, 1894) Holmes was an American physician, professor, lecturer, and author. Regarded by his peers as one of the best writers of the 19th century, he is considered a member of the Fireside Poets. His most famous prose works are the "Breakfast-Table" series, which began with The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table (1858). He is recognized as an important medical reformer. Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Holmes was educated at Phillips Academy and Harvard College. After graduating from Harvard in 1829, he briefly studied law before turning to the medical profession. He began writing poetry at an early age; one of his most famous works, "Old Ironsides", was published in 1830. Following training at the prestigious medical schools of Paris, Holmes was granted his M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1836. He taught at Dartmouth Medical School before returning to teach at Harvard and, for a time, served as dean there. During his long professorship, he became an advocate for various medical reforms and notably posited the controversial idea that doctors were capable of carrying puerperal fever from patient to patient. Holmes retired from Harvard in 1882 and continued writing poetry, novels and essays until his death in 1894. See more at: Oliver Wendell Holmes

--Word of the Day: plethoric \ple-THAWR-ik, -THOR-, PLETH-uh-rik\, adjective:

1. overfull; turgid; inflated: a plethoric, pompous speech.
2. of, pertaining to, or characterized by plethora.
Example:
He is a plethoric sleeper: literally a sleeper having an excess of red corpuscles in the blood (the opposite of anaemic), suggesting "unhealthy repletion", but here a "heavy" sleeper.
-- Arthur Conan Doyle, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, 1903

--Quote of the Day:One piece of log creates a small fire, adequate to warm you up, add just a few more pieces to blast an immense bonfire, large enough to warm up your entire circle of friends; needless to say that individuality counts but team work dynamites. ~Jin Kwon

--Language Arts-FRENCH:
toc
Definition: (exclamation) Toc toc! - Knock knock!
(informal) et toc ! - so there! serves you/him/etc right!
(informal adj) toc toc - crazy, nuts

* Please also visit fellow poets on our: ~ Current Guest Poet's Page ~
Current Poet: Sam To: "Polka"

** Please also visit fellow poets on our ~ Current Guest Poet's Page ~ .

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April 13, 2013

A Bachelor

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--Description: 20th C, Service R.W., Humor, Life, Marriage, Imagination, Parenting-- 



'Why keep a cow when I can buy,'
Said he, 'the milk I need,'
I wanted to spit in his eye
Of selfishness and greed;
But did not, for the reason he
Was stronger than I be.

I told him: ''Tis our human fate,
For better or for worse,
That man and maid should love and mate,
And little children nurse.
Of course, if you are less than man
You can't do what we can.

'So many loving maids would wed,
And wondrous mothers be.'
'I'll buy the love I want,' he said,
'No squally brats for me.'
. . . I hope the devil stoketh well
For him a special hell.


Robert William Service

--Did You Know: (January 16, 1874 – September 11, 1958) Robert W. Service was a poet and writer who has often been called "the Bard of the Yukon". Service is best known for his poems "The Shooting of Dan McGrew" and "The Cremation of Sam McGee", from his first book, Songs of a Sourdough (1907). "These humorous tales in verse were considered doggerel by the literary set, yet remain extremely popular to this day." Robert W. Service was born in Preston, Lancashire, England, the first of ten children. His father, also Robert Service, was a banker from Kilwinning, Scotland who had been transferred to England. At five years old Robert W. Service went to live in Kilwinning with his three maiden aunts and his paternal grandfather, who was the town's postmaster. There he is said to have composed his first verse, a grace, on his sixth birthday:
God bless the cakes and bless the jam;
Bless the cheese and the cold boiled ham:
Bless the scones Aunt Jeannie makes,
And save us all from bellyaches. Amen
Read more at: Robert W. Service

--Word of the Day: marmoreal \mahr-MAWR-ee-uhl, -MOHR-\, adjective:
of or like marble: skin of marmoreal smoothness.
Example:
Under the white banner of Andrew there was Renaul, and true love, and the ancient Greeks, with their lofty rhetoric and marmoreal beauty…
-- Daniel Mendelsohn, "The American Boy," The New Yorker, Jan. 7, 2013

--Quote of the Day: Poetry spills from the cracks of a broken heart, but flows from one which is loved. ~Christopher Paul Rubero

--Language Arts-SPANISH: ojalá, exclamation
I hope, if only!
This is another word which originates from Arabic (O Allah!) Originally it might have been used in fervent prayer, but now it means little more than I hope or the slightly more emotional if only. Don’t forget the upside down exclamation mark at the beginning and be careful to use a verb in the correct tense of the subjunctive after ¡ojalá!
Example:
- ¡Ojalá Toni venga hoy!
I hope Toni comes today!

- ¡Ojalá pudiera!
If only I could!

* Please also visit fellow poets on our: ~ Current Guest Poet's Page ~
Current Poet: Donal Mahoney
Poem: "Waiting for the Umpire"


Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. Subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter and Facebook.. We are also found on Pinterest and Google+.

Poets and Advertisers-please contact us to post your press releases, new book info, graphics and more at: coffeetablepoet@gmail.com

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April 3, 2013

A Hymn of the Sea

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--Description: 19th C, Bryant W., Nature--



The sea is mighty, but a mightier sways
His restless billows. Thou, whose hands have scooped
His boundless gulfs and built his shore, thy breath,
That moved in the beginning o'er his face,
Moves o'er it evermore. The obedient waves
To its strong motion roll, and rise and fall.
Still from that realm of rain thy cloud goes up,
As at the first, to water the great earth,
And keep her valleys green. A hundred realms
Watch its broad shadow warping on the wind,
And in the dropping shower, with gladness hear
Thy promise of the harvest. I look forth
Over the boundless blue, where joyously
The bright crests of innumerable waves
Glance to the sun at once, as when the hands
Of a great multitude are upward flung
In acclamation. I behold the ships
Gliding from cape to cape, from isle to isle,
Or stemming toward far lands, or hastening home
From the old world. It is thy friendly breeze
That bears them, with the riches of the land,
And treasure of dear lives, till, in the port,
The shouting seaman climbs and furls the sail.

But who shall bide thy tempest, who shall face
The blast that wakes the fury of the sea?
Oh God! thy justice makes the world turn pale,
When on the armed fleet, that royally
Bears down the surges, carrying war, to smite
Some city, or invade some thoughtless realm,
Descends the fierce tornado. The vast hulks
Are whirled like chaff upon the waves; the sails
Fly, rent like webs of gossamer; the masts
Are snapped asunder; downward from the decks,
Downward are slung, into the fathomless gulf,
Their cruel engines; and their hosts, arrayed
In trappings of the battle-field, are whelmed
By whirlpools, or dashed dead upon the rocks.
Then stand the nations still with awe, and pause,
A moment, from the bloody work of war.

These restless surges eat away the shores
Of earth's old continents; the fertile plain
Welters in shallows, headlands crumble down,
And the tide drifts the sea-sand in the streets
Of the drowned city. Thou, meanwhile, afar
In the green chambers of the middle sea,
Where broadest spread the waters and the line
Sinks deepest, while no eye beholds thy work,
Creator! thou dost teach the coral worm
To lay his mighty reefs. From age to age,
He builds beneath the waters, till, at last,
His bulwarks overtop the brine, and check
The long wave rolling from the southern pole
To break upon Japan. Thou bid'st the fires,
That smoulder under ocean, heave on high
The new-made mountains, and uplift their peaks,
A place of refuge for the storm-driven bird.
The birds and wafting billows plant the rifts
With herb and tree; sweet fountains gush; sweet airs
Ripple the living lakes that, fringed with flowers,
Are gathered in the hollows. Thou dost look
On thy creation and pronounce it good.
Its valleys, glorious with their summer green,
Praise thee in silent beauty, and its woods,
Swept by the murmuring winds of ocean, join
The murmuring shores in a perpetual hymn.


William Cullen Bryant

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Did You Know: (November 3, 1794 – June 12, 1878) William Cullen Bryant was an American romantic poet, journalist, and long-time editor of the New York Evening Post. Bryant was born on November 3, 1794, in a log cabin near Cummington, Massachusetts; the home of his birth is today marked with a plaque. He was the second son of Peter Bryant (b Aug. 12, 1767, d. Mar. 20 1820) a doctor and later a state legislator, and Sarah Snell (b. Dec.4 1768 d. May 6 1847). His maternal ancestry traces back to passengers on the Mayflower; his father's, to colonists who arrived about a dozen years later. Bryant and his family moved to a new home when he was two years old. He was admitted to the bar in 1815. He then began practicing law in nearby Plainfield, walking the seven miles from Cummington every day. On one of these walks, in December 1815, he noticed a single bird flying on the horizon; the sight moved him enough to write "To a Waterfowl". Bryant developed an interest in poetry early in life. Under his father's tutelage, he emulated Alexander Pope and other Neo-Classic British poets. Read more at: William Cullen Bryant

Quote of the Day: You never really understand a person
until you consider things from his point of view.
- Harper Lee

--Word of the Day: rialto \ree-AL-toh\, noun:
an exchange or mart.
Example:
We always did so in the same place, by a particular house, beyond the rialto in a steep-sloping backstreet of tenements, where advertisements turned in colours under the ivy.
-- China Miéville, Embassytown, 2011

--Language of the Arts-SPANISH: disgustar, verb / to upset
Example:
The ‘false friend’ that we will be looking at today is disgustado. Be careful not to use disgusted as a translation for disgustado. Estoy disgustado means I’m upset. If you really want to say I’m disgusted, you should use the phrase estoy indignado. Compare these examples.

Me disgustó su tono.
His tone upset me.

Está disgustado porque no aprobó el examen.
He’s upset because he failed the exam.

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** Please also visit fellow poets on our ~ Current Guest Poet's Page ~ .

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. Subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter and Facebook.. We are also found on Pinterest and Google+.

Poets and Advertisers-please contact us to post your press releases, new book info, graphics and more at: coffeetablepoet@gmail.com

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