June 16, 2013

1723

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-- 19th C, Dickinson E., Children, Life, Nature, Parenting --


High from the earth I heard a bird;
He trod upon the trees
As he esteemed them trifles,
And then he spied a breeze,
And situated softly
Upon a pile of wind
Which in a perturbation
Nature had left behind.
A joyous-going fellow
I gathered from his talk,
Which both of benediction
And badinage partook,
Without apparent burden,
I learned, in leafy wood
He was the faithful father
Of a dependent brood;
And this untoward transport
His remedy for care,—
A contrast to our respites.
How different we are!



Emily Dickinson

--Did You Know: (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) Emily Dickinson was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After she studied at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence. Although Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation. Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring topics in letters to her friends.

--Word of the Day: trachle \TRAH-khuh\, noun:
1. an exhausting effort, especially walking or working.
2. an exhausted or bedraggled person.
Example:
verb:
1. to fatigue; tire; wear out.
2. to bedraggle.

"It's getting a sore trachle up thae bits o' braes you have about Craigie. I'm no' so young as I used to be."
-- James Barke, The Wind That Shakes the Barley, 1946

--Quote of the Day: There's something like a line of gold thread running through a man's words when he talks to his daughter, and gradually over the years it gets to be long enough for you to pick up in your hands and weave into a cloth that feels like love itself. ~John Gregory Brown, Decorations in a Ruined Cemetery, 1994

--Language Arts-ITALIAN: comprendere: to include / verb
Example sentence: La lista comprenderà i nomi di tutti i vincitori
Translation: The list will include the names of all the winners.


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