September 18, 2012

All That's Past

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--Description: 20th C, de la Mare W .,Aging, Life, Memories, Nature--




Very old are the woods;
And the buds that break
Out of the brier's boughs,
When March winds wake,
So old with their beauty are--
Oh, no man knows
Through what wild centuries
Roves back the rose.
Very old are the brooks;
And the rills that rise
Where snow sleeps cold beneath
The azure skies
Sing such a history
Of come and gone,
Their every drop is as wise
As Solomon.

Very old are we men;
Our dreams are tales
Told in dim Eden
By Eve's nightingales;
We wake and whisper awhile,
But, the day gone by,
Silence and sleep like fields
Of amaranth lie.


Walter de la Mare

--Did You Know: (25 April 1873 – 22 June 1956) Walter de la Mare was an English poet, short story writer and novelist, probably best remembered for his works for children and the poem "The Listeners". He was born in Kent (at 83 Maryon Road, Charlton,[2] now part of the London Borough of Greenwich), descended from a family of French Huguenots, and was educated at St Paul's Cathedral School. His first book, Songs of Childhood, was published under the name Walter Ramal. He worked in the statistics department of the London office of Standard Oil for eighteen years while struggling to bring up a family, but nevertheless found enough time to write, and, in 1908, through the efforts of Sir Henry Newbolt he received a Civil List pension which enabled him to concentrate on writing. De la Mare also wrote some subtle psychological horror stories; "Seaton's Aunt" and "Out of the Deep" are noteworthy examples. His 1921 novel, Memoirs of a Midget, won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction. Read more at: Walter de la Mare

--Word of the Day: coetaneous \koh-i-TEY-nee-uhs\, adjective:
Of the same age or duration.
Example:
Bear with these distractions, with this coetaneous growth of the parts: they will one day be members, and obey one will.
-- Ralph Waldo Emerson, Self-Reliance and Other Essays

--Quote of the Day: About morals: I know only that
what is moral is what you feel good after
and what is immoral is what you feel bad after.
- Ernest Hemingway

--Language Arts: capace: skilled
adjective.
Example sentence: Tecnico giovane e capace cercasi per lavoro dinamico.
Translation: Young and skilled engineer wanted for dynamic job.

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Posted by V. Mahfood
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