January 12, 2012

A Song of Enchantment

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--Description: 20th C, de la Mare W ., Contentment, Nature-- 
 
A song of Enchantment I sang me there,
In a green-green wood, by waters fair,
Just as the words came up to me
I sang it under the wild wood tree.

Widdershins turned I, singing it low,
Watching the wild birds come and go;
No cloud in the deep dark blue to be seen
Under the thick-thatched branches green.

Twilight came: silence came:
The planet of Evening's silver flame;
By darkening paths I wandered through
Thickets trembling with drops of dew.

But the music is lost and the words are gone
Of the song I sang as I sat alone,
Ages and ages have fallen on me -
On the wood and the pool and the elder tree.



Walter de la Mare
--Did You Know: (25 April 1873 – 22 June 1956) Walter de la Mare was an English poet, short story writer and novelist, probably best remembered for his works for children and the poem "The Listeners". He was born in Kent (at 83 Maryon Road, Charlton,[2] now part of the London Borough of Greenwich), descended from a family of French Huguenots, and was educated at St Paul's Cathedral School. His first book, Songs of Childhood, was published under the name Walter Ramal. He worked in the statistics department of the London office of Standard Oil for eighteen years while struggling to bring up a family, but nevertheless found enough time to write, and, in 1908, through the efforts of Sir Henry Newbolt he received a Civil List pension which enabled him to concentrate on writing. De la Mare also wrote some subtle psychological horror stories; "Seaton's Aunt" and "Out of the Deep" are noteworthy examples. His 1921 novel, Memoirs of a Midget, won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction. Read more at: Walter de la Mare

--Word of the Day: paregmenon \puh-REG-muh-non\, noun:
The juxtaposition of words that have a common derivation, as in “sense and sensibility.”
Example:
Although as artificial as his use of traductio, this use of paregmenon at least reveals Sidney's ingenuity and wit.
-- Sherod M. Cooper, The Sonnets of Astrophel and Stella

--Quote of the Day: "We all go through life bristling
at our external limitations,
but the most difficult chains
to break are inside us."
- Bradley Whitford

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