September 3, 2011

Winter Song

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--Description: 19th C, Owens W., Nature, Seasons, War-- 


The browns, the olives, and the yellows died,
And were swept up to heaven; where they glowed
Each dawn and set of sun till Christmastide,
And when the land lay pale for them, pale-snowed,
Fell back, and down the snow-drifts flamed and flowed.

From off your face, into the winds of winter,
The sun-brown and the summer-gold are blowing;
But they shall gleam with spiritual glinter,
When paler beauty on your brows falls snowing,
And through those snows my looks shall be soft-going.


Wilfred Owen

--Did You Know: (18 March 1893 – 4 November 1918) Wilfred Owen was an English poet and soldier, one of the leading poets of the First World War. His shocking, realistic war poetry on the horrors of trenches and gas warfare was heavily influenced by his friend Siegfried Sassoon and sat in stark contrast to both the public perception of war at the time, and to the confidently patriotic verse written earlier by war poets such as Rupert Brooke. Some of his best-known works—most of which were published posthumously—include "Dulce et Decorum Est", "Insensibility", "Anthem for Doomed Youth", "Futility" and "Strange Meeting". Wilfred Owen was born the eldest of four children in Plas Wilmot; a house near Oswestry in Shropshire on 18 March 1893, of mixed English and Welsh ancestry. His siblings were Harold, Colin, and Mary Millard Owen. Owen is regarded by historians as the leading poet of the First World War, known for his war poetry on the horrors of trench and gas warfare. He had been writing poetry for some years before the war, himself dating his poetic beginnings to a stay at Broxton by the Hill, when he was ten years old. The Romantic poets Keats and Shelley influenced much of Owen's early writing and poetry. Read more at: Wilfred Owen

--Word of the Day: metaphrastic \met-uh-FRAST-ik\, adjective:
Having the quality of a literary work that has been translated or changed from one form to another, as prose into verse.
- In a word, the whole place was involved in the maze of a metaphrastic mystery; it enchanted our wanderers, and tempted them into fields of speculation.
-- Arthur Edward Waite, Belle and the Dragon

--Quote of the Day: There are two lasting bequests we can give our children
One is roots, the other is wings.
- Hodding Carter

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