April 29, 2010

Weekly Poetry News: 4/29/10

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April 26, 2010

Upon Julia's Clothes

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--Description: 17th C, Herrick R., Adoration, Love, Passion--
Whenas in silks my Julia goes,
Till, then, methinks, how sweetly flows
That liquefaction of her clothes!
Next, when I cast mine eyes, and see
That brave vibration each way free;
O how that glittering taketh me!

Robert Herrick

--Did You Know: (baptized 24 August 1591 – buried 15 October 1674) Herrick was a 17th century English poet. Born in Cheapside, London, he was the seventh child and fourth son of Nicholas Herrick, a prosperous goldsmith, who fell out of a window when Robert was a year old (whether this was suicide remains unclear). The tradition that Herrick received his education at Westminster is groundless. It is more likely that (like his uncle's children) he attended The Merchant Taylors' School. In 1607 he became apprenticed to his uncle, Sir William Herrick, who was a goldsmith and jeweler to the king. The apprenticeship ended after only six years when Herrick, at age twenty-two, matriculated at St John's College, Cambridge. He graduated in 1617. Robert Herrick became a member of the Sons of Ben, a group centered upon an admiration for the works of Ben Jonson. Herrick took holy orders in 1623, and became vicar of Dean Prior in Devonshire, but lost his position because of his Royalist bent. Read more at: Robert Herrick

--Word of the Day: Pygmalionism /(pig-MAY-lee-uh-niz-uhm)
noun:
1. The state of being in love with an object of one's own making.
2. The condition of loving an inanimate object such as a statue or image.
Example:
"Sarah Palin has been an exercise in Pygmalionism gone wrong. The most famous female politician in the world today is a vain and sanctimonious woman of boundless ambition and no vision."
Janet Bagnall; Setback for Women; The Gazette (Montreal, Canada); Feb 12, 2010.

--Quote of the Day: "Passion makes the world go round. Love just makes it a safer place.
~Ice T, The Ice Opinion, quoted in Reader's Digest, "Quotable Quotes," February 2002

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April 23, 2010

Where Be Ye Going, You Devon Maid

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--Description: 19th C, Keats J., Beauty, Nature-- 
Where be ye going, you Devon maid?
And what have ye there i' the basket?
Ye tight little fairy, just fresh from the dairy,
Will ye give me some cream if I ask it?

I love your meads, and I love your flowers,
And I love your junkets mainly,
But 'hind the door, I love kissing more,
O look not so disdainly!

I love your hills, and I love your dales,
And I love your flocks a-bleating;
But O, on the heather to lie together,
With both our hearts a-beating!

I'll put your basket all safe in a nook,
Your shawl I'll hang up on this willow,
And we will sigh in the daisy's eye,
And kiss on a grass-green pillow.


John Keats

--Did You Know: (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) Keats was an English poet, who became one of the key figures of the Romantic movement. Along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Keats was part of the Second Generation Romantic Poets. During his very short life his work received constant critical attacks from periodicals of the day, but his posthumous influence on poets such as Alfred Tennyson and Wilfred Owen would be immense. Keats's poetry was characterised by elaborate word choice and sensual imagery, notably in a series of odes that were his masterpieces, and which remain among the most popular poems in English literature. Keats's letters, which expound on his aesthetic theory of "negative capability", are among the most celebrated by any writer. John Keats was born in 1795 at 85 Moorgate in London, England, where his father, Thomas Keats, was a hostler. The pub is now called "Keats at the Globe", only a few yards from Moorgate station. The beginnings of his troubles occurred in 1804, when his father died of a fractured skull after falling from his horse. A year later, in 1805, Keats's grandfather died. His mother, Frances Jennings Keats, remarried soon afterwards, but quickly left the new husband and moved herself and her four children (a son had died in infancy) to live with Keats's grandmother, Alice Jennings. There, Keats attended a school that first instilled a love of literature in him. Read more at: John Keats

--Word of the Day: agrestic \uh-GRES-tik\, adjective:
Pertaining to fields or the country; rural; rustic.
Example:
The funniest and most agrestic of all his paintings were, undoubtedly, the cows.
-Robert Hughes, "An Outlaw Who Loved Laws", Time, July 26, 1993

--Quote of the Day: In every man's heart there is a secret nerve that answers to the vibrations of beauty.
~Christopher Morley

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April 21, 2010

Weekly Poetry News: 4/21/10

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April 20, 2010

It Was An April Morning Fresh and Clear

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--Description: 19th C, Wordsworth W., Nature, Seasons--
It was an April morning: fresh and clear
The Rivulet, delighting in its strength,
Ran with a young man's speed; and yet the voice
Of waters which the winter had supplied
Was softened down into a vernal tone.
The spirit of enjoyment and desire,
And hopes and wishes, from all living things
Went circling, like a multitude of sounds.
The budding groves seemed eager to urge on
The steps of June; as if their various hues
Were only hindrances that stood between
Them and their object: but, meanwhile, prevailed
Such an entire contentment in the air
That every naked ash, and tardy tree
Yet leafless, showed as if the countenance
With which it looked on this delightful day
Were native to the summer.--Up the brook
I roamed in the confusion of my heart,
Alive to all things and forgetting all.
At length I to a sudden turning came
In this continuous glen, where down a rock
The Stream, so ardent in its course before,
Sent forth such sallies of glad sound, that all
Which I till then had heard, appeared the voice
Of common pleasure: beast and bird, the lamb,
The shepherd's dog, the linnet and the thrush
Vied with this waterfall, and made a song,
Which, while I listened, seemed like the wild growth
Or like some natural produce of the air,
That could not cease to be. Green leaves were here;
But 'twas the foliage of the rocks--the birch,
The yew, the holly, and the bright green thorn,
With hanging islands of resplendent furze:
And, on a summit, distant a short space,
By any who should look beyond the dell,
A single mountain-cottage might be seen.
I gazed and gazed, and to myself I said,
"Our thoughts at least are ours; and this wild nook,
My EMMA, I will dedicate to thee."
----Soon did the spot become my other home,
My dwelling, and my out-of-doors abode.
And, of the Shepherds who have seen me there,
To whom I sometimes in our idle talk
Have told this fancy, two or three, perhaps,
Years after we are gone and in our graves,
When they have cause to speak of this wild place,
May call it by the name of EMMA'S DELL.

William Wordsworth

--Did You Know: (7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) Wordsworth was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1798 joint publication Lyrical Ballads. Wordsworth's magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semi-autobiographical poem of his early years which the poet revised and expanded a number of times. The work was posthumously titled and published, prior to which it was generally known as the poem "to Coleridge". Wordsworth was England's Poet Laureate from 1843 until his death in 1850. The second of five children born to John Wordsworth and Ann Cookson, William Wordsworth was born on 7 April 1770 in Wordsworth House in Cockermouth, Cumberland—part of the scenic region in northwest England, the Lake District. His sister, the poet and diarist Dorothy Wordsworth, to whom he was close all his life, was born the following year, and the two were baptised together. They had three other siblings: Richard, the eldest, who became a lawyer; John, born after Dorothy, who would become a poet and enjoy nature with William and Dorothy until he died in an 1809 shipwreck, from which only the captain escaped; and Christopher, the youngest, who would become an academician. Their father was a legal representative of James Lowther, 1st Earl of Lonsdale. Read more at: William Wordsworth

--Word of the Day: oneiric \oh-NY-rik\, adjective:
Of, pertaining to, or suggestive of dreams; dreamy.
Example:
On this score, the novel might easily drift off into an oneiric never-never land, but Mr. Welch doesn't let this happen.
-Peter Wild, "Visions of Blackfoot", New York Times, November 2, 1986

--Quote of the Day: And how should a beautiful, ignorant stream of water know it heads for an early release - out across the desert, running toward the Gulf, below sea level, to murmur its lullaby, and see the Imperial Valley rise out of burning sand with cotton blossoms, wheat, watermelons, roses, how should it know?
~Carl Sandburg, Good Morning America, 1928

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April 16, 2010

In My Sky At Twilight

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--Description: 20th C, Neruda P., Adoration, Love, Nature--
In my sky at twilight you are like a cloud
and your form and colour are the way I love them.
You are mine, mine, woman with sweet lips
and in your life my infinite dreams live.

The lamp of my soul dyes your feet,
the sour wine is sweeter on your lips,
oh reaper of my evening song,
how solitary dreams believe you to be mine!

You are mine, mine, I go shouting it to the afternoon's
wind, and the wind hauls on my widowed voice.
Huntress of the depth of my eyes, your plunder
stills your nocturnal regard as though it were water.

You are taken in the net of my music, my love,
and my nets of music are wide as the sky.
My soul is born on the shore of your eyes of mourning.
In your eyes of mourning the land of dreams begin.

--Did You Know: (July 12, 1904 – September 23, 1973) Ricardo Eliezer Neftalí Reyes y Basoalto was born in Parral, a city in Linares Province in the Maule Region, some 350 km south of Santiago. His father, José del Carmen Reyes Morales, was a railway employee; his mother, Rosa Basoalto, was a school teacher who died two months after he was born. Neruda and his father soon moved to Temuco, where his father married Trinidad Candia Marverde, a woman with whom he had had a child nine years earlier, a boy named Rodolfo. Neruda also grew up with his half-sister Laura, one of his father's children by another woman. The young Neruda was christened "Neftalí", his late mother's middle name. His father was opposed to Neruda's interest in writing and literature, but Neruda received encouragement from others, including future Nobel Prize winner Gabriela Mistral,Neruda's pen name was derived from Czech writer and poet Jan Neruda; Pablo is thought to be from Paul Verlaine. With his works translated into many languages, Pablo Neruda is considered one of the greatest and most influential poets of the 20th century. Read more at: Pablo Neruda

--Word of the Day: dishabille \dis-uh-BEEL\, noun:
1. The state of being carelessly or partially dressed.
2. Casual or lounging attire.
3. An intentionally careless or casual manner.
People meant to be fully clothed lounge around in dishabille.
-John Simon, "Tangled Up in Blue", New York Magazine, March 26, 2001

--Quote of the Day: Tell them dear, that if eyes were made for seeing,
Then beauty is its own excuse for being
~Ralph Waldo Emerson, "The Rhodora"

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April 15, 2010

By The Sea

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--Description: 19th C, Rosetti C., Nature--


Why does the sea moan evermore?
Shut out from heaven it makes its moan,
It frets against the boundary shore;
All earth's full rivers cannot fill
The sea, that drinking thirsteth still.

Sheer miracles of loveliness
Lie hid in its unlooked-on bed:
Anemones, salt, passionless,
Blow flower-like; just enough alive
To blow and multiply and thrive.

Shells quaint with curve, or spot, or spike,
Encrusted live things argus-eyed,
All fair alike, yet all unlike,
Are born without a pang, and die
Without a pang, and so pass by.

Christina G. Rossetti

--Did You Know: (5 December 1830 – 29 December 1894) Rossetti was a British poet, who wrote a variety of romantic, devotional, and children's poems. She is best known for her long poem Goblin Market, her love poem "Remember", and for the words of what became the popular Christmas carol "In the Bleak Midwinter". Rossetti was born in London and educated at home by her mother. Her siblings were the artist Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Michael Rossetti, and Maria Francesca Rossetti. Their father, Gabriele Rossetti, was an Italian poet and a political asylum seeker from Naples; their mother, Frances Polidori, was the sister of Lord Byron's friend and physician, John William Polidori, author of The Vampyre. In the 1840s her family was stricken with severe financial difficulties due to the deterioration of her father's physical and mental health. When she was 14, Rossetti suffered a nervous breakdown and left school. She, her mother, and her sister became seriously interested in the Anglo-Catholic movement that was part of the Church of England. This religious devotion played a major role in Rossetti's personal life. In her late teens she became engaged to the painter James Collinson, who was, like her brothers Dante and William, one of the founding members of the avant-garde artistic group, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, but this ended because he reverted to Catholicism. Later she became involved with the linguist Charles Cayley but did not marry him, also for religious reasons. Read more at: Christina G. Rossetti

--Word of the Day: burgeon \BUR-juhn\, intransitive verb:
1. To grow or develop quickly; flourish.
2. To begin to grow or blossom.
transitive verb:
1. To put forth, as buds.
noun:
1. A bud; sprout.
Example:
They fought aggressively to bring their burgeoning industry under their control; in so doing, they also worked to elevate Cleveland over Pittsburg as a refining center (which they accomplished in 1869).
-T.J. Stiles, The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt, April 2, 2009

--Quote of the Day: We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea, whether it is to sail or to watch - we are going back from whence we came.
-John F. Kennedy

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Weekly Poetry News: 4/15/10

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April 8, 2010

Weekly Poetry News: 4/8/10

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See what's going on the world of poets and poetry. Discover new events, literature, history and more. Check in often to saturate yourself with thoughts and words of poets and authors from around the world.


  • How Sweet I Roam'd from Field to Field (guardian.co.uk)


  • William Blake | Philip Pullman (guardian.co.uk)


  • Happy birthday, Swedenborg - the man who invented the Romantics | Jonathan Jones (guardian.co.uk)


  • Masters First Round: The Ugly Truth About Tiger Woods (bleacherreport.com)


  • Is William Blake Britain's best artist? | Jonathan Jones (guardian.co.uk)
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    April 5, 2010

    To Spring~

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    --Description: 19th C, Blake W., Nature, Seasons--
    O thou with dewy locks, who lookest down
    Through the clear windows of the morning, turn
    Thine angel eyes upon our western isle,
    Which in full choir hails thy approach, O Spring!

    The hills tell one another, and the listening
    Valleys hear; all our longing eyes are turn’d
    Up to thy bright pavilions: issue forth
    And let thy holy feet visit our clime!

    Come o’er the eastern hills, and let our winds
    Kiss thy perfumèd garments; let us taste
    Thy morn and evening breath; scatter thy pearls
    Upon our lovesick land that mourns for thee.

    O deck her forth with thy fair fingers; pour
    Thy soft kisses on her bosom; and put
    Thy golden crown upon her languish’d head,
    Whose modest tresses are bound up for thee.

    William Blake

    --Did You Know:(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) Blake was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His prophetic poetry has been said to form "what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language".[1] His visual artistry has led one modern critic to proclaim him "far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced". On 8th October 1779, Blake became a student at the Royal Academy in Old Somerset House, near the Strand. While the terms of his study required no payment, he was expected to supply his own materials throughout the six-year period. There, he rebelled against what he regarded as the unfinished style of fashionable painters such as Rubens, championed by the school's first president, Joshua Reynolds. Over time, Blake came to detest Reynolds' attitude toward art, especially his pursuit of "general truth" and "general beauty". Read more at: William Blake

    --Word of the Day: arcane\ar-KAYN\, adjective:
    Understood or known by only a few.
    Quote:
    There are other arcane traditions that seem like superstitions to us, or, perhaps, are simply lost in translation. Some cyclists, for instance, believe that riders should shower instead of bathe because in some way water weight from baths is absorbed.
    -Allen Barra, "Tour de Lance", Wall Street Journal, July 28, 2009

    --Quote of the Day: What is more cheerful, now, in the fall of the year, than an open-wood-fire? Do you hear those little chirps and twitters coming out of that piece of apple-wood? Those are the ghosts of the robins and blue-birds that sang upon the bough when it was in blossom last Spring. In Summer whole flocks of them come fluttering about the fruit-trees under the window: so I have singing birds all the year round.
    -Thomas Bailey Aldrich

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    April 4, 2010

    Easter Week

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    --Description: 19th C, Kingsley C., Holidays--
    See the land, her Easter keeping,
    Rises as her Maker rose.
    Seeds, so long in darkness sleeping,
    Burst at last from winter snows.
    Earth with heaven above rejoices;
    Fields and gardens hail the spring;
    Shaughs and woodlands ring with voices,
    While the wild birds build and sing.

    You, to whom your Maker granted
    Powers to those sweet birds unknown,
    Use the craft by God implanted;
    Use the reason not your own.
    Here, while heaven and earth rejoices,
    Each his Easter tribute bring-
    Work of fingers, chant of voices,
    Like the birds who build and sing.

    Charles Kingsley

    --Did You Know: (12 June 1819 – 23 January 1875) Kingsley was an English clergyman, university professor, historian, and novelist, particularly associated with the West Country and north-east Hampshire. Kingsley was born in Holne, Devon, the second son of the Rev. Charles Kingsley and his wife Mary. His brother, Henry Kingsley, also became a novelist. He spent his childhood in Clovelly, Devon and Barnack, Northamptonshire and was educated at Helston Grammar School[1] before studying at King's College London, and the University of Cambridge. Charles entered Magdalene College, Cambridge in 1838, and graduated in 1842.[2] He chose to pursue a ministry in the church. From 1844, he was rector of Eversley in Hampshire, and in 1860, he was appointed Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Cambridge. Kingsley's interest in history is shown in several of his writings, including The Heroes (1856), a children's book about Greek mythology, and several historical novels, of which the best known are Hypatia (1853), Hereward the Wake (1865), and Westward Ho! (1855). He was sympathetic to the idea of evolution, and was one of the first to praise Charles Darwin's book On the Origin of Species. Read more at: Charles Kingsley

    --Word of the Day: portentous \por-TEN-tus\, adjective:
    1. Foreboding; foreshadowing, especially foreshadowing ill; ominous.
    2. Marvelous; prodigious; wonderful; as, a beast of portentous size.
    3. Pompous.
    Example:
    This victory is without doubt a very special and portentous gift of the gods, she said, "for I believe that there now stands before you the one leader who is the single most qualified to lead us to the peace we long for."
    -- Seth Mydans, "Wounded Sri Lankan Sees 'Gift of Gods' in Re-election.", New York Times, December 23, 1999

    --Quote of the Day:
    Easter tells us that life is to be interpreted not simply in terms of things but in terms of ideals.
    -Charles M. Crowe

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    April 2, 2010

    To Sleep

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    --Description: 19th C, Keats J., Night, Peace, Sleep, Sonnet--
    O soft embalmer of the still midnight!
    Shutting, with careful fingers and benign,
    Our gloom-pleas'd eyes, embower'd from the light,
    Enshaded in forgetfulness divine;
    O soothest Sleep! if so it please thee, close,
    In midst of this thine hymn, my willing eyes.
    Or wait the Amen, ere thy poppy throws
    Around my bed its lulling charities;
    Then save me, or the passed day will shine
    Upon my pillow, breeding many woes;
    Save me from curious conscience, that still hoards
    Its strength for darkness, burrowing like a mole;
    Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards,
    And seal the hushed casket of my soul.

    John Keats

    --Did You Know: (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) Keats was an English poet, who became one of the key figures of the Romantic movement. Along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Keats was part of the Second Generation Romantic Poets. During his very short life his work received constant critical attacks from periodicals of the day, but his posthumous influence on poets such as Alfred Tennyson and Wilfred Owen would be immense. Keats's poetry was characterised by elaborate word choice and sensual imagery, notably in a series of odes that were his masterpieces, and which remain among the most popular poems in English literature. Keats's letters, which expound on his aesthetic theory of "negative capability", are among the most celebrated by any writer. John Keats was born in 1795 at 85 Moorgate in London, England, where his father, Thomas Keats, was a hostler. The pub is now called "Keats at the Globe", only a few yards from Moorgate station. The beginnings of his troubles occurred in 1804, when his father died of a fractured skull after falling from his horse. A year later, in 1805, Keats's grandfather died. His mother, Frances Jennings Keats, remarried soon afterwards, but quickly left the new husband and moved herself and her four children (a son had died in infancy) to live with Keats's grandmother, Alice Jennings. There, Keats attended a school that first instilled a love of literature in him. Read more at: John Keats

    --Word of the Day: bedizen \bih-DY-zuhn\, transitive verb:
    To dress or adorn in gaudy manner.
    Example:
    At 18, he attended a party "frizzled, powdered and curled, in radiant pink satin, with waistcoat bedizened with gems of pink paste and a mosaic of colored foils and a hat blazing with 5,000 metallic beads," according to Michael Battersberry in "Fashion, The Mirror of History."
    -Donna Larcen, "Details Details: Everything Old Is New Again", St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May 19, 1994

    --Quote of the Day: Every tomorrow has two handles. We can take hold of it with the handle of anxiety or the handle of faith.
    -Henry Ward Beecher

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    April 1, 2010

    To One in Paradise

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    --Description: 19th C, Poe E.A., Death, Love, Passion--



    Thou wast all that to me, love,
    For which my soul did pine-
    A green isle in the sea, love,
    A fountain and a shrine,
    All wreathed with fairy fruits and flowers,
    And all the flowers were mine.

    Ah, dream too bright to last!
    Ah, starry Hope! that didst arise
    But to be overcast!
    A voice from out the Future cries,
    "On! on!"- but o'er the Past
    (Dim gulf!) my spirit hovering lies
    Mute, motionless, aghast!

    For, alas! alas! me
    The light of Life is o'er!
    "No more- no more- no more-"
    (Such language holds the solemn sea
    To the sands upon the shore)
    Shall bloom the thunder-blasted tree
    Or the stricken eagle soar!

    And all my days are trances,
    And all my nightly dreams
    Are where thy grey eye glances,
    And where thy footstep gleams-
    In what ethereal dances,
    By what eternal streams.


    Edgar Allen Poe

    --Did You Know: (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) Poe was an American writer, poet, editor and literary critic, considered part of the American Romantic Movement. Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre, Poe was one of the earliest American practitioners of the short story and is considered the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction. He was the first well-known American writer to try to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career. He was born as Edgar Poe in Boston, Massachusetts; his parents died when he was young. Poe was taken in by John and Frances Allan, of Richmond, Virginia, but they never formally adopted him. He attended the University of Virginia for one semester but left due to lack of money. After enlisting in the Army and later failing as an officer's cadet at West Point, Poe parted ways with the Allans. Poe's publishing career began humbly, with an anonymous collection of poems, Tamerlane and Other Poems (1827), credited only to "a Bostonian". Read more at: E.A. Poe

    --Word of the Day: sylvan \SIL-vuhn\, adjective:
    1. Of or pertaining to woods or forest regions.
    2. Living or located in a wood or forest.
    3. Abounding in forests or trees; wooded.
    noun:
    1. A fabled deity or spirit of the woods.
    2. One that lives in or frequents the woods or forest; a rustic.
    Example:
    They probably picture it as a kind of modest conservatory, set in sylvan splendour in some charmingly landscaped garden.
    -Sally Vincent, "Driven by daemons", Guardian, November 10, 2001

    --Quote of the Day: The greatest hazard of all, losing one’s self, can occur very quietly in the world, as if it were nothing at all.
    -Soren Kierkegaard

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