January 30, 2010

Terrific Two of the Week: 1/25-1/29/10

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? Which poets are your favorites?  Leave a comment with your  thoughts, and let me know which classic you would like to see. The two, terrific poems of the week for me were:

--A Man's Requirements and --The Human Seasons

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below. Just click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
January 25, 2010
The Exposed Nest
--Description: 20th C, Frost R., Humanity, Nature, Seasons--

January 26, 2010
The Human Seasons
--Description: 19th C, Keats J., Humanity, Life, Seasons--

January 27, 2010
Introduction to Poetry
--Description: 21st C, Collins B., Fantasy, Humor, Poetry--

January 28, 2010
A Man's Requirements

--Description: 19th C, Browning E.B., Love, Passion--


January 29, 2010
A Character
--Description: 19th C, Wordsworth W., Humanity, Nature--



------------ooooooooo------------


Word of the Day: doff \DOF\, transitive verb:
1. To take off, as an article of clothing.
2. To tip or remove (one's hat).
3. To put aside; to rid oneself of.
Example
After I finished sweeping, I grabbed my check, went to the locker room, and doffed the monkey suit, slipped into my jeans, sneakers and T-shirt and broke camp.
-Reginald McKnight, White Boys: Stories

Quote of the day: Life is now. There was never a time when your life was not now, nor will there ever be.
-Eckhart Tolle

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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January 27, 2010

Introduction to Poetry

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Let this delightful poem inspire your day!
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--Description: 21st C, Collins B., Fantasy, Humor, Poetry--

I ask them to take a poem
and hold it up to the light
like a color slide

or press an ear against its hive.

I say drop a mouse into a poem
and watch him probe his way out,

or walk inside the poem's room
and feel the walls for a light switch.

I want them to waterski
across the surface of a poem
waving at the author's name on the shore.

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means.

Billy Collins

--Did You Know: (born March 22, 1941) Collins is an American poet. He served two terms as the Poet Laureate of the United States from 2001 to 2003. He was recently appointed the Irving Bacheller Chair of Creative Writing at Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida, and is a Visiting Scholar with the Winter Park Institute. He remains a Distinguished Professor at Lehman College of the City University of New York. Collins was born in New York City to William and Katherine Collins. Katherine Collins was a nurse who stopped working to raise the couple's only child. Mrs. Collins had the ability to recite verses on almost any subject, which she often did, and cultivated in her young son the love of words, both written and spoken. Over the years, Poetry has awarded Collins several prizes in recognition of poems they publish. During the 1990s, Collins won five such prizes. The magazine also selected him as "Poet of the Year" in 1994. In 2005 Collins was the first annual recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for Humor in Poetry. Read more at: Billy Collins

--Poetry Terminology: Magnum Opus -
An artist or poet's 'great work' e.g. Milton's Paradise Lost.

--Word of the Day: perambulate \puh-RAM-byuh-layt\, intransitive verb:
1. To walk about; to roam; to stroll; as, "he perambulated in the park."
transitive verb:
1. To walk through or over.
2. To travel over for the purpose of surveying or inspecting.
Example:
Every weekend, the police close off ten to fifteen blocks of some Manhattan avenue. The merchants line the curbs, and the New Yorkers slowly perambulate up and down.
-Richard Brookhiser, "Island Bazaar", National Review, July 1, 2002

--Quote of the Day: A well-developed sense of humor is the pole that adds balance to your steps as you walk the tightrope of life.
-William Arthur Ward

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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Posted by V. Mahfood
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January 23, 2010

Terrific Two of the Week: 1/18-1/22/10

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? Which poets are your favorites?  Leave a comment with your  thoughts, and let me know which classic you would like to see. The two, terrific poems of the week for me were:

--I Must Have Wanton Poets and --Now Bare to the Beholder's Eye

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below. Just click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
January 18, 2010
I Must Have Wanton Poets
--Description: 16th C, Marlowe C., Nobility, Poetry, Tribute--



January 19, 2010
The Folly of Being Comforted
--Description: 20th C, Yeats, W.B., Aging, Life, Love, Passion--



January 20, 2010
The Freedom of the Moon
--Description: 2, Frost R., Nature, Night--



January 21, 2010
Now Bare to the Beholder's Eye
--Description: 19th C, Stevenson R.L., Adoration, Love, Passion--



January 22, 2010
I Said To Love
--Description: 20th C, Hardy T., Adoration, Love--



Quote of the day: Our firmest convictions are apt to be the most suspect, they mark our limitations and our bounds. Life is a petty thing unless it is moved by the indomitable urge to extend its boundaries.
-José Ortega y Gasset


Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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Posted by V. Mahfood


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January 15, 2010

Terrific Two of the Week: 1/11-1/15/10

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? Which poets are your favorites?  Leave a comment with your  thoughts, and let me know which classic you would like to see. The two, terrific poems of the week for me were:

--Lullaby and --Evening

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below. Just click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
January 11, 2010
The Bridge
--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H.W., Memories, Disillusion, Nature, Night--



January 12, 2010
Solomon To Sheba
--Description: 20th C, Yeats W.B., Adoration, Beauty, Desire, Love, Solomon--


January 13, 2010
Lullaby
--Description: 20th C, Auden W.H., Dreams, Love, Night, Sleep--



January 14, 2010
somewhere i have never travelled,gladly beyond
--Description: 20th C, Cummings E.E., Love, Nature--


January 15, 2010
Evening
--Description: 19th C, Clare J., Humanity, Nature, Night--




--------------------------------------
Weekend Haiku:

"How slowly time flies"
Blue eyes, warm smiles, gentle touch
Longing is constant."

V. Mahfood

--------------------------------------


Quote of the day: There’s a trick to the “graceful exit.” It begins with the vision to recognize when a job, a life stage, or a relationship is over — and let it go. It means leaving what’s over without denying its validity or its past importance to our lives. It involves a sense of future, a belief that every exit line is an entry, that we are moving up, rather than out.
-Ellen Goodman


Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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Posted by V. Mahfood

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Evening

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--Description: 19th C, Clare J., Humanity, Nature, Night--


'Tis evening; the black snail has got on his track,
And gone to its nest is the wren,
And the packman snail, too, with his home on his back,
Clings to the bowed bents like a wen.

The shepherd has made a rude mark with his foot
Where his shadow reached when he first came,
And it just touched the tree where his secret love cut
Two letters that stand for love's name.

The evening comes in with the wishes of love,
And the shepherd he looks on the flowers,
And thinks who would praise the soft song of the dove,
And meet joy in these dew-falling hours.

For Nature is love, and finds haunts for true love,
Where nothing can hear or intrude;
It hides from the eagle and joins with the dove,
In beautiful green solitude.

John Clare

--Did You Know: (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) Clare was an English poet, born the son of a farm labourer who came to be known for his representations of the English countryside. His poetry underwent a major re-evaluation in the late 20th century and he is often now considered to be among the most important 19th-century poets. In his early adult years, Clare became a pot-boy in the Blue Bell public house and fell in love with Mary Joyce; but her father, a prosperous farmer, forbade her to meet him. Subsequently he was a gardener at Burghley House. He enlisted in the militia, tried camp life with Gypsies, and worked in Pickworth as a lime burner in 1817. Malnutrition stemming from childhood may be the main culprit behind his 5-foot stature and may have contributed to his poor physical health in later life. Read more at: John Clare

--Word of the Day: irenic \eye-REN-ik; -REE-nik\, adjective:
Tending to promote peace; conciliatory.
Example:
With an irenic spirit they join the debate, at times ugly and vicious, about the historicity of the Bible (by which they mean the Hebrew Scriptures, also known as the Old Testament).
-Phyllis Trible, "God's Ghostwriters", New York Times, February 4, 2001

--Quote of the Day:
Life is known only by those who have found a way to be comfortable with change and the unknown. Given the nature of life, there may be no security, but only adventure.
-Rachel Naomi Remen

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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Posted by V. Mahfood

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January 13, 2010

Lullaby

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--Description: 20th C, Auden W.H., Dreams, Love, Night, Sleep--


Lay your sleeping head, my love,
Human on my faithless arm;
Time and fevers burn away
Individual beauty from
Thoughtful children, and the grave
Proves the child ephemeral:
But in my arms till break of day
Let the living creature lie,
Mortal, guility, but to me
The entirely beautiful.

Soul and body have no bounds:
To lovers as they lie upon
Her tolerant enchanted slope
In their ordinary swoon,
Grave the vision Venus sends
Of supernatural sympathy,
Universal love and hope;
While abstract insight wakes
Among the glaciers and the rocks
The hermit's sensual ecstasy.

Certainty, fidelity
On the stroke of midnight pass
Like vibrations of a bell,
And fashionable madmen raise
Their pedantic boring cry:
Every farthing of the cost,
All the dreaded cards foretell,
Shall be paid, but from this night
Not a whisper, not a thought,
Not a kiss nor look be lost.

Beauty, midnight, vision dies:
Let the winds of dawn that blow
Softly round your dreaming head
Such a day of sweetness show
Eye and knocking heart may bless,
Find your mortal world enough;
Noons of dryness see you fed
By the involuntary powers,
Nights of insult let you pass
Watched by every human love

W. H. Auden
--Did You Know: (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) Auden grew up in Birmingham in a professional middle-class family and read English literature at Christ Church, Oxford. His early poems, written in the late 1920s and early 1930s, alternated between telegraphic modern styles and fluent traditional ones, were written in an intense and dramatic tone. He signed his works W. H. Auden and was an Anglo-American poet, born in England, later an American citizen, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century.His work is noted for its stylistic and technical achievements, its engagement with moral and political issues, and its variety of tone, form and content. The central themes of his poetry are love, politics and citizenship, religion and morals, and the relationship between unique human beings and the anonymous, impersonal world of nature. Read more at: W. H. Auden

--Word of the Day: quotidian \kwoh-TID-ee-uhn\, adjective:
1. Occurring or returning daily; as, a quotidian fever.
2. Of an everyday character; ordinary; commonplace.
Examle:
Erasmus thought More's career as a lawyer was a waste of a fine mind, but it was precisely the human insights More derived from his life in the quotidian world that gave him a moral depth Erasmus lacked.
-"More man than saint", Irish Times, April 4, 1998

--Quote of the Day: Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.
-Anonymous

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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Posted by V. Mahfood


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January 10, 2010

Terrific Two of the Week: 12/29/09 - 1/9/10

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? Which poets are your favorites?  Leave a comment with your  thoughts, and let me know which classic you would like to see. The two, terrific poems of the week for me were:

--Life's Harmonies and --The Song

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below. Just click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
December 29, 2009
The Bear
--Description: 20th C, Frost R., Life, Nature, Humanity --



December 30, 2009
Life Lessons
--Description: 20th C, Riley J.W., Childhood, Children, Encouragement,Hope--




December 31, 2009
The Birds
--Description: 2, Belloc H., Christianity, Nature--



January 2, 2010
To Her Royal Highness The Princess of ***
--Description: 18th C, Voltaire., Beauty, Love, Nobility, Passion--



January 3, 2010
Life's Harmonies
--Description: 20th C, Yeats W. B., Adoration, Love--




January 4, 2010
Lily Bell and Thistledown Song
--Description: 19thC, Alcot Louisa M., Hope, Joy, Nature--




January 7, 2010
Lines By A Person of Quality
--Description: 20th C, Yeats W. B., Adoration, Love--




January 8, 2010
The Computation
--Description: 17th C, Donne J., Death, Love, Separation--




January 9, 2010
The Song
--Description: 19th C, Poe Edgar A., Joy, Love, Marriage--




--------------------------------------
Weekend Haiku:

"Crystalline sparkles
Warm breath of body suffuses
Joy enfolds lovers."

V. Mahfood

--------------------------------------


Quote of the day: A kiss makes the heart young again and wipes out the years.
-Rupert Brooke



Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Submit a poem on Coffee Table Poetry's GUEST BOOK FOR POETS

Coffee Table Poetry's Guest Book

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Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps
Posted by V. Mahfood


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