December 12, 2010

Firelight and Nightfall

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--Description: 20th C, Lawrence D.H., Nature--


The darkness steals the forms of all the queens,
But oh, the palms of his two black hands are red,
Inflamed with binding up the sheaves of dead
Hours that were once all glory and all queens.

And I remember all the sunny hours
Of queens in hyacinth and skies of gold,
And morning singing where the woods are scrolled
And diapered above the chaunting flowers.

Here lamps are white like snowdrops in the grass;
The town is like a churchyard, all so still
And grey now night is here; nor will
Another torn red sunset come to pass.
D. H. Lawrence

--Did You Know: (11 September 1885 – 2 March 1930) Lawrence was an English author, poet, playwright, essayist and literary critic. His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. In them, Lawrence confronts issues relating to emotional health and vitality, spontaneity, human sexuality and instinct. Lawrence's opinions earned him many enemies and he endured official persecution, censorship, and misrepresentation of his creative work throughout the second half of his life, much of which he spent in a voluntary exile he called his "savage pilgrimage." At the time of his death, his public reputation was that of a pornographer who had wasted his considerable talents. E. M. Forster, in an obituary notice, challenged this widely held view, describing him as, "The greatest imaginative novelist of our generation." Later, the influential Cambridge critic F. R. Leavis championed both his artistic integrity and his moral seriousness, placing much of Lawrence's fiction within the canonical "great tradition" of the English novel. Lawrence is now generally valued as a visionary thinker and significant representative of modernism in English literature, although some feminists object to the attitudes toward women and sexuality found in his works. Read more at: D. H. Lawrence

--Word of the Day: heuristic \hyoo-RIS-tik\, adjective:
1. Serving to indicate or point out; stimulating interest as a means of furthering investigation.
2. Encouraging a person to learn, discover, understand, or solve problems on his or her own, as by experimenting, evaluating possible answers or solutions, or by trial and error.
3. Of, pertaining to, or based on experimentation, evaluation, or trial-and-error methods.
4. Denoting a rule of thumb for solving a problem without the exhaustive application of an algorithm
Example:
Faced with this data-driven discussion, I've noticed most patients will come to rely on either what their doctors suggest (which is often subject to the same heuristic errors above) or the kind of decision making fallacies aforementioned.
-- Tara Parker Pope, "Life After a Lifesaving Treatment," Well Blog, New York Times, October, 2010.

--Quote of the Day: A diplomat is a man who always remembers a woman's birthday but never remembers her age.
-Robert Frost

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1 comments:

Steve Finnell on December 13, 2010 at 6:35 PM said...

you are invited to follow my blog

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