September 14, 2012

Marriage A-La-Mode

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--Description: 17th C, Dryden J., Love, Marriage, Separation-- 
 
Why should a foolish marriage vow,
Which long ago was made,
Oblige us to each other now
When passion is decay'd?
We lov'd, and we lov'd, as long as we could,
Till our love was lov'd out in us both:
But our marriage is dead, when the pleasure is fled:
'Twas pleasure first made it an oath.

If I have pleasures for a friend,
And farther love in store,
What wrong has he whose joys did end,
And who could give no more?
'Tis a madness that he should be jealous of me,
Or that I should bar him of another:
For all we can gain is to give our selves pain,
When neither can hinder the other.

John Dryden

--Did You Know: (9 August 1631 – 1 May 1700)  John Dryden was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles as the Age of Dryden. Walter Scott named him "Glorious John." After the Restoration, Dryden quickly established himself as the leading poet and literary critic of his day and he transferred his allegiances to the new government. Along with Astraea Redux, Dryden welcomed the new regime with two more panegyrics; To His Sacred Majesty: A Panegyric on his Coronation (1662), and To My Lord Chancellor (1662). These poems suggest that Dryden was looking to court a possible patron, but he was to instead make a living in writing for publishers, not for the aristocracy, and thus ultimately for the reading public. Read more at: John Dryden

--Poetry Terminology: Feminine Ending -
Line of verse with an extra unstressed syllable at the end.

--Word of the Day: cheechako \chee-CHAH-koh\, noun:
A tenderfoot; greenhorn; newcomer.
Example:
He is a genial liar, this Yukoner, and for the ordinary lies of life he needs make no effort; they roll from his lips as regularly and as smoothly as do compliments from the lips of a sour dough man in conversation with a cheechako girl.
-- James Augustus Hall, Starving on a bed of gold.

--Quote of the Day: One advantage of marriage is that, when you fall out of love with him or he falls out of love with you, it keeps you together until you fall in again. ~Judith Viorst

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Posted by V. Mahfood
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