August 29, 2012

Rondel of Merciless Beauty

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--Description: 14th C, Chaucer G., Adoration, Beauty, Love--


Your two great eyes will slay me suddenly;
Their beauty shakes me who was once serene;
Straight through my heart the wound is quick and keen.

Only your word will heal the injury
To my hurt heart, while yet the wound is clean -
Your two great eyes will slay me suddenly;
Their beauty shakes me who was once serene.

Upon my word, I tell you faithfully
Through life and after death you are my queen;
For with my death the whole truth shall be seen.
Your two great eyes will slay me suddenly;
Their beauty shakes me who was once serene;
Straight through my heart the wound is quick and keen.


Geoffrey Chaucer

--Did You Know: 1343 – 25 October 1400) Chaucer was an English author, poet, philosopher, bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Although he wrote many works, he is best remembered for his unfinished frame narrative The Canterbury Tales. Sometimes called the father of English literature, Chaucer is credited by some scholars as the first author to demonstrate the artistic legitimacy of the vernacular English language, rather than French or Latin. Chaucer was born circa 1343 in London, though the exact date and location of his birth are not known. His father and grandfather were both London vintners and before that, for several generations, the family members were merchants in Ipswich. His name is derived from the French chausseur, meaning shoemaker.[1] In 1324 John Chaucer, Geoffrey's father, was kidnapped by an aunt in the hope of marrying the twelve-year-old boy to her daughter in an attempt to keep property in Ipswich. The aunt was imprisoned and the £250 fine levied suggests that the family was financially secure, upper middle-class, if not in the elite. Read more: Geoffrey Chaucer

--Poetry Terminology: Rondel -
Another poem of French origin, normally consisting of fourteen lines, but with only two rhymes. The first and second, seventh and eighth, and thirteenth and fourteenth lines are the same. The most common rhyme scheme is: A-B-b-a-a-b-A-B-a-b-b-a-A-B.

--Word of the Day: plucky \PLUHK-ee\, adjective:
Having or showing pluck or courage; brave.
Example:
Little Orphan Annie will soon skip off into the newspaper sunset, Tribune Media Services announced last week in canceling the plucky 86-year-old redhead.
-Michael Cavna, "Why canceled 'Little Orphan Annie' is really seeing her final 'tomorrow'"

--Quote of the Day: Beauty... when you look into a woman's eyes and see what is in her heart.
~Nate Dircks

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