February 18, 2010

The Rainy Day

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--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H.W., Nature, Seasons, Sorrow--
The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the moldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.

My life is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
My thoughts still cling to the moldering Past,
But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast
And the days are dark and dreary.

Be still, sad heart! and cease repining;
Behind the clouds is the sun still shining;
Thy fate is the common fate of all,
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

--Did You Know: (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) Longellow was an American educator and poet whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and "Evangeline". He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri's The Divine Comedy and was one of the five Fireside Poets.Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, then part of Massachusetts, and studied at Bowdoin College. After spending time in Europe he became a professor at Bowdoin and, later, at Harvard College. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Longfellow retired from teaching in 1854 to focus on his writing, living the remainder of his life in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in a former headquarters of George Washington. His first wife, Mary Potter, died in 1835 after a miscarriage. His second wife, Frances Appleton, died in 1861 after sustaining burns from her dress catching fire. After her death, Longfellow had difficulty writing poetry for a time and focused on his translation. He died in 1882. Longfellow predominantly wrote lyric poems which are known for their musicality and which often presented stories of mythology and legend. He became the most popular American poet of his day and also had success overseas. He has been criticized, however, for imitating European styles and writing specifically for the masses. Read more at: Henry W. Longfellow

--Poetry Terminology: Rising Meter-
Term used to describe end-stressed meters such as iambic and anapestic - as opposed to falling meter.

--Word of the Day: obnubilate / PRONUNCIATION: /(ob-NOO-buh-layt, -NYOO-)
verb tr.: To cloud over, obscure, or darken.
Example:
"In the room which Monsieur [Jacques Parizeau] vacated so suddenly, the 'body odour of race', to quote Montreal poet A.M. Klein, will continue to obnubilate until a window breaks."
-Peter Reimann; Monsieur's Lapse; The Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada); Nov 3, 1995.

--Quote of the Day: Only a fool tests the depth of the water with both feet.
-African Proverb

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