January 15, 2010

Evening

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Let this delightful poem charm your day!
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--Description: 19th C, Clare J., Humanity, Nature, Night--


'Tis evening; the black snail has got on his track,
And gone to its nest is the wren,
And the packman snail, too, with his home on his back,
Clings to the bowed bents like a wen.

The shepherd has made a rude mark with his foot
Where his shadow reached when he first came,
And it just touched the tree where his secret love cut
Two letters that stand for love's name.

The evening comes in with the wishes of love,
And the shepherd he looks on the flowers,
And thinks who would praise the soft song of the dove,
And meet joy in these dew-falling hours.

For Nature is love, and finds haunts for true love,
Where nothing can hear or intrude;
It hides from the eagle and joins with the dove,
In beautiful green solitude.

John Clare

--Did You Know: (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) Clare was an English poet, born the son of a farm labourer who came to be known for his representations of the English countryside. His poetry underwent a major re-evaluation in the late 20th century and he is often now considered to be among the most important 19th-century poets. In his early adult years, Clare became a pot-boy in the Blue Bell public house and fell in love with Mary Joyce; but her father, a prosperous farmer, forbade her to meet him. Subsequently he was a gardener at Burghley House. He enlisted in the militia, tried camp life with Gypsies, and worked in Pickworth as a lime burner in 1817. Malnutrition stemming from childhood may be the main culprit behind his 5-foot stature and may have contributed to his poor physical health in later life. Read more at: John Clare

--Word of the Day: irenic \eye-REN-ik; -REE-nik\, adjective:
Tending to promote peace; conciliatory.
Example:
With an irenic spirit they join the debate, at times ugly and vicious, about the historicity of the Bible (by which they mean the Hebrew Scriptures, also known as the Old Testament).
-Phyllis Trible, "God's Ghostwriters", New York Times, February 4, 2001

--Quote of the Day:
Life is known only by those who have found a way to be comfortable with change and the unknown. Given the nature of life, there may be no security, but only adventure.
-Rachel Naomi Remen

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1 comments:

R. Jacob on January 16, 2010 at 11:27 AM said...

My, you have been busy.

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