December 31, 2009

Happy New Year 2010

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Happy New Year to all my wonderful and loyal readers whom support me each and every day. I hope your New Year 2010 is blessed with health, happiness, prosperity and love.


I will take off New Year's Day to celebrate with family, but will be right back with you after that! Have a safe and joyous evening whatever you do.




V. Mahfood
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December 28, 2009

Winter: A Dirge

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--Description: 18th C, Burns R., Seasons--

The wintry west extends his blast,
And hail and rain does blaw;
Or the stormy north sends driving forth
The blinding sleet and snaw:
While, tumbling brown, the burn comes down,
And roars frae bank to brae;
And bird and beast in covert rest,
And pass the heartless day.

“The sweeping blast, the sky o’ercast,”
The joyless winter day
Let others fear, to me more dear
Than all the pride of May:
The tempest’s howl, it soothes my soul,
My griefs it seems to join;
The leafless trees my fancy please,
Their fate resembles mine!

Thou Power Supreme, whose mighty scheme
These woes of mine fulfil,
Here firm I rest; they must be best,
Because they are Thy will!
Then all I want—O do Thou grant
This one request of mine!—
Since to enjoy Thou dost deny,
Assist me to resign.

Robert Burns

--Did You Know: (25 January 1759 – 21 July 1796) Burns (also known as Rabbie Burns, Scotland's favourite son, the Ploughman Poet, the Bard of Ayrshire and in Scotland as simply The Bard[1][2]) was a Scottish poet and a lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland, and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a "light" Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He also wrote in standard English, and in these pieces, his political or civil commentary is often at its most blunt. He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement and after his death became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism. A cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish Diaspora around the world, celebration of his life and work became almost a national charismatic cult during the 19th and 20th centuries, and his influence has long been strong on Scottish literature. In 2009 he was voted by the Scottish public as being the Greatest Scot, through a vote run by Scottish television channel STV. Read more at: Robert Burns

--Word of the Day: lambent \LAM-buhnt\, adjective:
1. Playing lightly on or over a surface; flickering; as, "a lambent flame; lambent shadows."
2. Softly bright or radiant; luminous; as, "a lambent light."
3. Light and brilliant; as, "a lambent style; lambent wit."
Example:
I have an image in my mind of the soaring vault rising and disappearing into the gray-white silence, the niches in the salt walls where the saints dwelled, the few points of lambent gold glimmering feebly on the altar.
-- Richard O'Mara, "The Unapologetic Tourist", New York Times, November 21, 1999

--Quote of the Day: Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything.
-Plato

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What German playwright penned the lyrics to Mack the Knife and Alabama Song?
Answer: Bertolt Brecht

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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December 23, 2009

Christmas in the Olden Times

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--Description: 19th C, Sir Scott W., Holidays, Seasons--


On Christmas-eve the bells were rung;
The damsel donned her kirtle sheen;
The hall was dressed with holly green;
Forth to the wood did merry men go,
To gather in the mistletoe.
Thus opened wide the baron hall
To vassal, tenant, serf and all;
Power laid his rod of rule aside
And ceremony doffed his pride.
The heir, with roses in his shoes,
That night might village partner choose;
The lord, underogating, share
The vulgar game of "Post and Pair."
All hailed, with uncontrolled delight,
And general voice, the happy night
That to the cottage, as the crown,
Brought tidings of salvation down.

The fire, with well-dried logs supplied,
Went roaring up the chimney wide;
The huge hall-table's oaken face,
Scrubbed till it shone, the day to grace,
Bore then upon its massive board
No mark to part the squire and lord.
Then was brought in the lusty brawn
By old blue-coated serving man;
Then the grim boar's head frowned on high,
Crested with bays and rosemary.
Well can the green-garbed ranger tell
How, when and where the monster fell;
What dogs before his death he tore,
And all the baitings of the boar.
The wassal round, in good brown bowls,
Garnished with ribbons, blithely trowls.
There the huge sirloin reeked: hard by
Plum-porridge stood, and Christmas pye;
Nor failed old Scotland to produce,
At such high-tide, her savory goose.

Then came the merry maskers in,
And carols roared with blithesome din.
If unmelodious was the song,
It was a hearty note, and strong;
Who lists may in their murmuring see
Traces of ancient mystery;
White shirts supplied the masquerade,
And smutted cheeks the visors made;
But O, wht maskers richly dight,
Can boast of bosoms half so light!


Sir Walter Scott

--Did You Know:(15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) Walter Scott was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet, popular throughout Europe during his time. Scott was particularly associated with Toryism. Scott was the first English-language author to have a truly international career in his lifetime, with many contemporary readers in Europe, Australia, and North America. His novels and poetry are still read, and many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature. Famous titles include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, The Lady of The Lake, Waverley, The Heart of Midlothian and The Bride of Lammermoor. Born in College Wynd in the Old Town of Edinburgh in 1771, the son of a solicitor, Scott survived a childhood bout of polio in 1773 that left him lame. To cure his lameness he was sent in 1773 to live in the rural Borders region at his grandparents' farm at Sandyknowe, adjacent to the ruin of Smailholm Tower, the earlier family home. Here he was taught to read by his aunt Jenny, and learned from her the speech patterns and many of the tales and legends that characterized much of his work. Read more at: Sir Walter Scott

--Word of the Day: largess \lar-ZHES; lar-JES; LAR-jes\, noun;
also largesse:
1. Generous giving (as of gifts or money), often accompanied by condescension.
2. Gifts, money, or other valuables so given.
3. Generosity; liberality.
Example:
Four years after her marriage she exclaimed giddily over her father-in-law's largess: "He has given Waldorf the Waldorf Astoria Hotel for a birthday present!"
-- Stacy Schiff, "Otherwise Engaged", New York Times, March 19, 2000

--Quote of the Day: One of the sanest, surest, and most generous joys of life comes from being happy over the good fortune of others.
-Robert A. Heinlein

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What German playwright penned the lyrics to Mack the Knife and Alabama Song?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What was an official language in 87 nations and territories, by 1994?
Answer: English

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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December 21, 2009

Merry Christmas and a Happy Holiday Season

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Merry Christmas and a happy holiday season to all our poetic friends at Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers. May your New Year be filled with good health, a brighter prosperity, and a renewed energy to tackle an exciting 2010.

This site gives us so much pleasure in fulfilling your poetic requests. We often choose the daily poem, but your selections are even more important, and we are always happy to fulfill your requests.

Thank you for your friendship, support, comments and following. They are the sweet things that motivate us daily, and make this site so worthwhile.

Coffee Table Poetry will be taking a couple days off for holiday reflection on December 24th and 25th, and will be back in operation on December 26th. We look forward to interacting and working with you then.

******************

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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December 19, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 12/14-12/18/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? Which poets are your favorites?  Leave a comment with your  thoughts, and let me know which classic you would like to see. The two, terrific poems of the week for me were:

--Ceremonies for Christmas and --The Cap and Bells

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below. Just click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
December 14, 2009
Sonnet: On The Sonnet
--Description: 19th C, Keats J., Sonnet--



December 15, 2009
The Grave and the Rose
--Description: 19th C, Hugo V., Death, Life--


December 16, 2009
Ceremonies for Christmas
--Description: 17th C, Herrick R., Holidays, Seasons--



December 17, 2009
In The Bleak MidWinter

--Description: 19th C, Rossetti C., Christianity, Christmas, Holidays, Seasons--


December 18, 2009
The Cap and Bells
--Description: 20th C, Yeats W. B., Adoration, Love--




--------------------------------------
Weekend Haiku:

"Blessings sprinkled round
This wondrous season of love
Filled with miracles."

V. Mahfood

--------------------------------------

--Word of the Day: cogitate \KOJ-uh-tayt\, intransitive verb:
1. To think deeply or intently; to ponder; to meditate.
2. To think about; to ponder on; to meditate upon; to plan or plot.
Example:
As she waited in the prison anteroom to be admitted, Bitsey read background file clippings from NEWS Magazine's morgue and cogitated on the idea of knowing one's exact date of death beforehand.
-Dewey Gram, The Life of David Gale

--Quote of the Day: Now, the essence, the very spirit of Christmas is that we first make believe a thing is so, and lo, it presently turns out to be so.
-Stephen Leacock

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN:What regional accent did Americans deem sexiest, most liked and most recognizable?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
Where was the Cubist art movement founded?

Answer: Paris

...SEE THE NEXT POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


Submit a poem on Coffee Table Poetry's GUEST BOOK FOR POETS

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Posted by V. Mahfood







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December 17, 2009

In The Bleak MidWinter

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--Description: 19th C, Rossetti C., Christianity, Christmas, Holidays, Seasons--



In the bleak mid-winter
Frosty wind made moan,
Earth stood hard as iron,
Water like a stone;
Snow had fallen, snow on snow,
Snow on snow,
In the bleak mid-winter
Long ago.

Our God, Heaven cannot hold Him
Nor earth sustain;
Heaven and earth shall flee away
When He comes to reign:
In the bleak mid-winter
A stable-place sufficed
The Lord God Almighty,
Jesus Christ.

Enough for Him, whom cherubim
Worship night and day,
A breastful of milk
And a mangerful of hay;
Enough for Him, whom angels
Fall down before,
The ox and ass and camel
Which adore.

Angels and archangels
May have gathered there,
Cherubim and seraphim
Thronged the air,
But only His mother
In her maiden bliss,
Worshipped the Beloved
With a kiss.

What can I give Him,
Poor as I am?
If I were a shepherd
I would bring a lamb,
If I were a wise man
I would do my part,
Yet what I can I give Him,
Give my heart.


Christina Rossetti


--Did You Know: (5 December 1830 – 29 December 1894) Christina was the sister of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and like him she showed promise as a poet while still very young. She was educated at home and encouraged to write by her family; her teenage poems were printed by her grandfather on his own press. She was a devout Anglican, and refused two suitors on religious grounds: the painter James Collinson because he became a Roman Catholic; and Charles Bagot Cayley, because he was an atheist. Perhaps as a result of this self-denial, a recurrent theme in her poetry is the rejection of earthly passion in favour of spiritual devotion. Even those poems with a strong element of fantasy in them, such as 'Goblin Market' or 'The Prince's Progress' are often written with a clear moral purpose in mind. Rossetti's health was always poor, and illness had rendered her an invalid by the time she was fifty. She continued to write however, producing Time Flies: A Reading Diary (1885), which contained poems and thoughts for each day, and The Face of the Deep: A Devotional Commentary on the Apocalypse (1892). After her death her brother W.M. Rossetti brought out an edition of her later poetry, New Poems, in 1896, and edited her Collected Poems (1904). Read more at:

--Word of the Day: predilection \preh-d'l-EK-shun; pree-\, noun:
A predisposition to choose or like; an established preference.
Example:
Wilson doesn't see any inconsistency between his socialism and his predilection for the high life.
-Marina Cantacuzino, "On deadly ground", The Guardian, March 13, 2001

--Quote of the Day: Christianity does not remove you from the world and its problems; it makes you fit to live in it, triumphantly and usefully.
-Charles Templeton

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What European country delights the Pope with the lowest divorce rate in the western world?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What country has bee the planet's largest aid donor since 1991?
Answer: Japan
...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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December 15, 2009

The Grave and the Rose

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--Description: 19th C, Hugo V., Death, Life--

The Grave said to the Rose,
"What of the dews of dawn,
Love's flower, what end is theirs?"
"And what of spirits flown,
The souls whereon doth close
The tomb's mouth unawares?"
The Rose said to the Grave.

The Rose said, "In the shade
From the dawn's tears is made
A perfume faint and strange,
Amber and honey sweet."
"And all the spirits fleet
Do suffer a sky-change,
More strangely than the dew,
To God's own angels new,"
The Grave said to the Rose.

Victor Marie Hugo

--Did You Know: (26 February 1802 – 22 May 1885) Hugo was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights activist and exponent of the Romantic movement in France. In France, Hugo's literary fame rests not only upon his novels, but also upon his poetic and dramatic achievements. Among many volumes of poetry, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem, and Hugo is sometimes identified as the greatest French poet. Outside France, his best-known works are the novels Les Misérables and Notre-Dame de Paris (known in English also as The Hunchback of Notre Dame). Though a committed conservative royalist when he was young, Hugo grew more liberal as the decades passed; he became a passionate supporter of republicanism, and his work touches upon most of the political and social issues and artistic trends of his time. He is buried in the Panthéon. Read more at: Victor M. Hugo

--Word of the Day: gallimaufry \gal-uh-MAW-free\, noun:
A hodgepodge; jumble; confused medley.
Example:
Today bilingual programs are conducted in a gallimaufry of around 80 tongues, ranging from Spanish to Lithuanian to Micronesian Yapese.
-Ezra Bowen, "For Learning or Ethnic Pride?", Time, July 8, 1985

--Quote of the Day:
As winter strips the leaves from around us, so that we may see the distant regions they formerly concealed, so old age takes away our enjoyments only to enlarge the prospect of the coming eternity.
-Jean Paul

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What Western Hemisphere people spoke Nahuatl?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What do the Chinese call kwai-tsze, or "quick little fellows"?
Answer: Chopsticks

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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December 14, 2009

Sonnet: On The Sonnet

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--Description: 19th C, Keats J., Sonnet--


If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd,
And, like Andromeda, the Sonnet sweet
Fetter'd, in spite of pained loveliness,
Let us find, if we must be constrain'd,
Sandals more interwoven and complete
To fit the naked foot of Poesy:
Let us inspect the Lyre, and weigh the stress
Of every chord, and see what may be gain'd
By ear industrious, and attention meet;
Misers of sound and syllable, no less
Than Midas of his coinage, let us be
Jealous of dead leaves in the bay wreath crown;
So, if we may not let the Muse be free,
She will be bound with garlands of her own.

John Keats

--Did You Know: (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) Keats was an English poet, who became one of the key figures of the Romantic movement. Along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Keats was part of the Second Generation Romantic Poets. During his very short life his work received constant critical attacks from periodicals of the day, but his posthumous influence on poets such as Alfred Tennyson and Wilfred Owen would be immense. Keats's poetry was characterised by elaborate word choice and sensual imagery, notably in a series of odes that were his masterpieces, and which remain among the most popular poems in English literature. Keats's letters, which expound on his aesthetic theory of "negative capability", are among the most celebrated by any writer. John Keats was born in 1795 at 85 Moorgate in London, England, where his father, Thomas Keats, was a hostler. The pub is now called "Keats at the Globe", only a few yards from Moorgate station. The beginnings of his troubles occurred in 1804, when his father died of a fractured skull after falling from his horse. A year later, in 1805, Keats's grandfather died. His mother, Frances Jennings Keats, remarried soon afterwards, but quickly left the new husband and moved herself and her four children (a son had died in infancy) to live with Keats's grandmother, Alice Jennings. There, Keats attended a school that first instilled a love of literature in him. Read more at: John Keats

--Word of the Day: recalcitrant \rih-KAL-sih-truhnt\, adjective:
Stubbornly resistant to and defiant of authority or restraint.
Example:
If they lingered too long, Clarice hurried them along in the same annoyed way she rushed recalcitrant goats through the gate.
-Kaye Gibbons, On the Occasion of My Last Afternoon

--Quote of the Day: Let us not pray to be sheltered from dangers but to be fearless when facing them.
-Rabindranath Tagore

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What do the Chinese call kwai-tsze, or "quick little fellows"?

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS TRIVIA:
What regional accent did Americans deem sexiest, most liked and most recognizable?
Answer: Southern

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


Submit a poem on Coffee Table Poetry's GUEST BOOK FOR POETS

Coffee Table Poetry's Guest Book

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Posted by V. Mahfood






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December 12, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 12/5-12/11/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? Which poets are your favorites?  Leave a comment with your  thoughts, and let me know which classic you would like to see. The two, terrific poems of the week for me were:

--So We'll Go No More A-Roving and --Our Singing Strength

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below. Just click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
December 5, 2009
Our Singing Strength
--Description: 20th C, Frost R., Nature, Seasons--


December 7, 2009
She Sweeps With Many Colored Brooms
--Description: 19th C, Dickinson E., Humanity, Nature--


December 8, 2009
The Autumn
--Description: 19th C, Browning E.B., Life, Nature, Seasons--



December 9, 2009
i have found what you are like
--Description: 20th C, Cummings E.E., Adoration, Love, Nature--



December 10, 2009
Ave Maria Plena Gratia
--Description: 19th C, Wilde O., Christianity, Christmas, Hope, Sonnet--


December 11, 2009
So We'll Go No More A-Roving
--Description: 2, Byron G. G., Celestial, Love, Night--



--------------------------------------
Weekend Haiku:

"Snowdrops that tingle
Delicious cranberry wine
Sweet hot plum puddings."

V. Mahfood

--------------------------------------

--Word of the Day: nonplus \non-PLUHS\, transitive verb:
To cause to be at a loss as to what to think, say, or do; to confound; to perplex; to bewilder.
Example:
Mr Esswis had promptly negotiated an arrangement between himself, the owner of the sprayer and the owner of the sheep, nonplussing the other two farmers by accepting full blame of the straying animal, as long as unpleasantness and paperwork could be avoided.
-Michel Faber, Under the Skin: A Novel

--Quote of the Day: Because gratification of a desire leads to the temporary stilling of the mind and the experience of the peaceful, joyful Self, it's no wonder that we get hooked on thinking that happiness comes from the satisfaction of desires. This is the meaning of the old adage, "Joy is not in things, it is in us."
-Joan Borysenko

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN:What regional accent did Americans deem sexiest, most liked and most recognizable?
ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What country is almost twice as large as either the U.S. or China?
Answer: Russia

...SEE THE NEXT POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


Submit a poem on Coffee Table Poetry's GUEST BOOK FOR POETS

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