November 28, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 11/18-11/27/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? Which poets are your favorites?  Leave a comment with your  thoughts, and let me know which classic you would like to see. The two, terrific poems of the week for me were:

--Barter and --Thanksgiving

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below. Just click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
November 18, 2009

Footsteps of Angels
--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H.W., Death, Life, Night--



November 19, 2009
A Drop Fell On An Apple Tree
--Description: 19th C, Dickinson E., Nature, Seasons--


November 20, 2009
Barter
--Description: 20th C, Teasedale S., Contentment, Joy, Life--





November 24, 2009
The Little Black Boy
--Description: 19th C, Blake W., Childhood, Christianity, Humanity--



November 25, 2009
Thanksgiving
--Description: 20th C, Wilcox E.W., Contentment, Holidays, Peace, Thanks--



November 26, 2009
A Thanksgiving Poem
--Description: 20th C, Dunbar P.L., Christianity, Contentment, Holidays, Peace, Thanks--

November 27, 2009
Design
--Description: 20th C, Frost R., Death, Life, Nature--




--------------------------------------
Weekend Haiku:

"Family sweetness
The finest wine of our lives
Brimming in goblets."

V. Mahfood

--------------------------------------

--Word of the Day: loquacious \loh-KWAY-shuhs\, adjective:
1. Very talkative.
2. Full of excessive talk; wordy.
Example:
The meeting went on for hours, accommodating loquacious bores who were each allowed their say.
--Andrew Sullivan, "Gay Life, Gay Death", The New Republic, December 17, 1990

--Quote of the Day: Love is not a mere sentiment. Love is the ultimate truth at the heart of creation.
-Rabindranath Tagore

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN:What famous document begins, "When in the course of human events?"

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What U.S. State boasts a town called Captain Cook?
Answer: Hawaii

...SEE THE NEXT POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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November 27, 2009

Design

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--Description: 20th C, Frost R., Death, Life, Nature--


I found a dimpled spider, fat and white,
On a white heal-all, holding up a moth
Like a white piece of rigid satin cloth--
Assorted characters of death and blight
Mixed ready to begin the morning right,
Like the ingredients of a witches' broth--
A snow-drop spider, a flower like a froth,
And dead wings carried like a paper kite.

What had that flower to do with being white,
The wayside blue and innocent heal-all?
What brought the kindred spider to that height,
Then steered the white moth thither in the night?
What but design of darkness to appall?--
If design govern in a thing so small.

Robert Frost

--Did You Know: (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) Frost was an American poet. He is highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech. His work frequently employed settings from rural life in New England in the early twentieth century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. A popular and often-quoted poet, Frost was honored frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry. Robert Frost was born in San Francisco, California to journalist William Prescott Frost, Jr., and Isabelle Moodie. His mother was of Scottish descent, and his father descended from Nicholas Frost of Tiverton, Devon, England, who had sailed to New Hampshire in 1634 on the Wolfrana. Frost's father was a teacher and later an editor of the San Francisco Evening Bulletin. After his father's death on May 5, 1885, in due time the family moved across the country to Lawrence, Massachusetts under the patronage of (Robert's grandfather) William Frost, Sr., who was an overseer at a New England mill. Frost graduated from Lawrence High School in 1892. Frost's mother joined the Swedenborgian church and had him baptized in it, but he left it as an adult. Despite his later association with rural life, Frost grew up in the city, and published his first poem in his high school's magazine. Read more at .. Robert Frost

--Word of the Day: convoke / PRONUNCIATION: (kuhn-VOHK) , verb tr.:
To call together for a meeting.
Example:
They insist that Mr Zelaya violated the constitution by trying to convoke a constituent assembly which they fear might have prolonged his term.
Post-coup Honduras; The Economist (London, UK); Jul 9 2009.

--Quote of the Day: The smallest act of kindness is worth more than the grandest intention.
-Oscar Wilde


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What U.S. State boasts a town called Captain Cook?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What is the University of Paris more commonly called?
Answer: The Sorbonne

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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November 25, 2009

Thanksgiving

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--Description: 20th C, Wilcox E.W., Contentment, Holidays, Peace, Thanks--


We walk on starry fields of white
And do not see the daisies;
For blessings common in our sight
We rarely offer praises.
We sigh for some supreme delight
To crown our lives with splendor,
And quite ignore our daily store
Of pleasures sweet and tender.

Our cares are bold and push their way
Upon our thought and feeling.
They hang about us all the day,
Our time from pleasure stealing.
So unobtrusive many a joy
We pass by and forget it,
But worry strives to own our lives
And conquers if we let it.

There’s not a day in all the year
But holds some hidden pleasure,
And looking back, joys oft appear
To brim the past’s wide measure.
But blessings are like friends, I hold,
Who love and labor near us.
We ought to raise our notes of praise
While living hearts can hear us.

Full many a blessing wears the guise
Of worry or of trouble.
Farseeing is the soul and wise
Who knows the mask is double.
But he who has the faith and strength
To thank his God for sorrow
Has found a joy without alloy
To gladden every morrow.

We ought to make the moments notes
Of happy, glad Thanksgiving;
The hours and days a silent phrase
Of music we are living.
And so the theme should swell and grow
As weeks and months pass o’er us,
And rise sublime at this good time,
A grand Thanksgiving chorus.

Ella Wheeler Wilcox

--Did You Know: (November 5, 1850–October 30, 1919) Wilcox was an American author and poet. Her best-known work was Poems of Passion. Her most enduring work was "Solitude", which contains the lines: "Laugh, and the world laughs with you; Weep, and you weep alone". Her autobiography, The Worlds and I, was published in 1918, a year before her death. Ella Wheeler was born in 1850 on a farm in rural Johnstown, Wisconsin, east of Janesville, the youngest of four children. The family soon moved to north of Madison. She started writing poetry at a very early age, and was well known as a poet in her own state by the time she graduated from high school. When about 28 years of age, she married Robert Wilcox. They had one child, a son, who died shortly after birth. Not long after their marriage, they both became interested in Theosophy, New Thought, and Spiritualism. Read more at: Ella Wheeler Wilcox

--Word of the Day: billingsgate \BIL-ingz-gayt; -git\, noun:
Coarsely abusive, foul, or profane language.
Example:
Chaney would yell at him in his own particular patois -- an unapologetic stream of billingsgate far more creative than Marine drill instructors or master rappers.
-- George Vecsey, "Learning at Temple: Se Habla Chaneyism", New York Times, March 19, 2000

--Quote of the Day: "I awoke this morning with devout thanksgiving for my friends, the old and the new."
~Ralph Waldo Emerson


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: Which is further from the equator: Tasmania, Tanzania or Transylvania?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What finally went out of fashion in ancient Rome, prompting people to begin wearing short pants called feminalia?
Answer: The toga

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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November 24, 2009

The Little Black Boy

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--Description: 19th C, Blake W., Childhood, Christianity, Humanity--

My mother bore me in the southern wild,
And I am black, but oh my soul is white!
White as an angel is the English child,
But I am black, as if bereaved of light.

My mother taught me underneath a tree,
And, sitting down before the heat of day,
She took me on her lap and kissed me,
And, pointed to the east, began to say:

"Look on the rising sun: there God does live,
And gives His light, and gives His heat away,
And flowers and trees and beasts and men receive
Comfort in morning, joy in the noonday.

"And we are put on earth a little space,
That we may learn to bear the beams of love
And these black bodies and this sunburnt face
Is but a cloud, and like a shady grove.

"For when our souls have learn'd the heat to bear,
The cloud will vanish, we shall hear His voice,
Saying, 'Come out from the grove, my love and care
And round my golden tent like lambs rejoice',"

Thus did my mother say, and kissed me;
And thus I say to little English boy.
When I from black and he from white cloud free,
And round the tent of God like lambs we joy

I'll shade him from the heat till he can bear
To lean in joy upon our Father's knee;
And then I'll stand and stroke his silver hair,
And be like him, and he will then love me.

William Blake

--Did You Know: (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) Blake was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His prophetic poetry has been said to form "what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language". His visual artistry has led one modern critic to proclaim him "far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced". Although he only once journeyed farther than a day's walk outside London during his lifetime, he produced a diverse and symbolically rich corpus, which embraced the imagination as "the body of God" or "Human existence itself".Considered mad by contemporaries for his idiosyncratic views, Blake is held in high regard by later critics for his expressiveness and creativity, and for the philosophical and mystical undercurrents within his work. His paintings and poetry have been characterized as part of both the Romantic movement and "Pre-Romantic", for its large appearance in the 18th century. Reverent of the Bible but hostile to the Church of England, Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of the French and American revolutions. The singularity of Blake's work makes him difficult to classify. The 19th century scholar William Rossetti characterised Blake as a "glorious luminary,"and as "a man not forestalled by predecessors, nor to be classed with contemporaries, nor to be replaced by known or readily surmisable successors." Historian Peter Marshall has classified Blake as one of the forerunners of modern anarchism. Read more at: William Blake

--Word of the Day: cosset \KOSS-it\, transitive verb:
1. To treat as a pet; to treat with excessive indulgence; to pamper.
2. A pet, especially a pet lamb.
Example:
Sumner's parents, for instance, were routinely attended by butlers, maids, coachmen and grooms while little Sumner and his sister, Emily, were pampered and cosseted from infancy by nurserymaids and governesses.
-Benjamin Welles, Sumner Welles: FDR's Global Strategist

--Quote of the Day: When we quit thinking primarily about ourselves and our own self-preservation, we undergo a truly heroic transformation of consciousness.
-Joseph Campbell


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What finally went out of fashion in ancient Rome, prompting people to begin wearing short pants called feminalia?

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS TRIVIA:
What European country uses its Latin name, Helvetia, on its stamps?
Answer: Switzerland

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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November 20, 2009

Note to Loyal Readers

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Pin It Coffee Table Poetry will be taking a brief hiatus for a few days due to a LONG overdue family visit.

I very much appreciate my loyal and devoted readers, and will pick right back up as soon as family leaves the middle of next week!

Have a wonderful weekend and week!
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November 19, 2009

A Drop Fell on the Apple Tree

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--Description: 19th C, Dickinson E., Nature, Seasons--

A drop fell on the apple tree
Another on the roof;
A half a dozen kissed the eaves,
And made the gables laugh.

A few went out to help the brook,
That went to help the sea.
Myself conjectured, Were they pearls,
What necklaces could be!

The dust replaced in hoisted roads
The birds jocoser sung;
The sunshine threw his hat away,
The orchards spangles hung.

The breezes brought dejected
And bathed them in the glee;
The East put out a single flag,
And signed the fete away.

Emily Dickinson

--Did You Know: (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) Dickinson was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After she studied at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence. Although Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime.[2] The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation.[3] Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring topics in letters to her friends. Read more at: Emily Dickinson

--Word of the Day: truculent \TRUCK-yuh-luhnt\, adjective:
1. Fierce; savage; ferocious; barbarous.
2. Cruel; destructive; ruthless.
Example:
I ask whether impeachment will become still another arrow in the quiver of the warrior class of ever more truculent partisan politicians in Washington.

--Quote of the Day: Your example is far more influential and inspiring than any words of instruction, or threats, or even words of encouragement.
-Jonathan Lockwood Huie


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What religion has the most adherents: Buddhism, Christianity or Islam?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What was 11th-century Spanish military leader Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar better know as?
Answer: El Cid

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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November 18, 2009

Footsteps of Angels

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--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H.W., Death, Life, Night--


When the hours of Day are numbered,
And the voices of the Night
Wake the better soul, that slumbered,
To a holy, calm delight;

Ere the evening lamps are lighted,
And, like phantoms grim and tall,
Shadows from the fitful firelight
Dance upon the parlor wall;

Then the forms of the departed
Enter at the open door;
The beloved, the true-hearted,
Come to visit me once more;

He, the young and strong, who cherished
Noble longings for the strife,
By the roadside fell and perished,
Weary with the march of life!

They, the holy ones and weakly,
Who the cross of suffering bore,
Folded their pale hands so meekly,
Spake with us on earth no more!

And with them the Being Beauteous,
Who unto my youth was given,
More than all things else to love me,
And is now a saint in heaven.

With a slow and noiseless footstep
Comes that messenger divine,
Takes the vacant chair beside me,
Lays her gentle hand in mine.

And she sits and gazes at me
With those deep and tender eyes,
Like the stars, so still and saint-like,
Looking downward from the skies.

Uttered not, yet comprehended,
Is the spirit's voiceless prayer,
Soft rebukes, in blessings ended,
Breathing from her lips of air.

Oh, though oft depressed and lonely,
All my fears are laid aside,
If I but remember only
Such as these have lived and died!


Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

--Did You Know: (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) Longellow was an American educator and poet whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and "Evangeline". He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri's The Divine Comedy and was one of the five Fireside Poets.Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, then part of Massachusetts, and studied at Bowdoin College. After spending time in Europe he became a professor at Bowdoin and, later, at Harvard College. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Longfellow retired from teaching in 1854 to focus on his writing, living the remainder of his life in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in a former headquarters of George Washington. His first wife, Mary Potter, died in 1835 after a miscarriage. His second wife, Frances Appleton, died in 1861 after sustaining burns from her dress catching fire. After her death, Longfellow had difficulty writing poetry for a time and focused on his translation. He died in 1882. Longfellow predominantly wrote lyric poems which are known for their musicality and which often presented stories of mythology and legend. He became the most popular American poet of his day and also had success overseas. He has been criticized, however, for imitating European styles and writing specifically for the masses.

--Word of the Day: desultory \DES-uhl-tor-ee\, adjective:
1. Jumping or passing from one thing or subject to another without order or rational connection; disconnected; aimless.
2. By the way; as a digression; not connected with the subject.
3. Coming disconnectedly or occurring haphazardly; random.
4. Disappointing in performance or progress.
Example:
The shadows on the perfect lawn were straight and angular; they were the shadows of an old man sitting in a deep wicker-chair near the low table on which the tea had been served, and of two younger men strolling to and fro, in desultory talk, in front of him.
-Henry James Jr., "The Portrait of a Lady", The Atlantic Monthly, November 1880

--Quote of the Day: Sameness is the mother of disgust, variety the cure.
-Francesco Petrarch


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What was 11th-century Spanish military leader Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar better know as?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What European country does Aruba maintain the strongest ties to?
Answer: The Netherlands

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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November 16, 2009

Autumn

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May this seasonal poem soothe your day!



--Description: 19th C, Rossetti D.G., Nature, Seasons, Sleep--

Know'st thou not at the fall of the leaf
How the heart feels a languid grief
Laid on it for a covering,
And how sleep seems a goodly thing
In Autumn at the fall of the leaf?

And how the swift beat of the brain
Falters because it is in vain,
In Autumn at the fall of the leaf
Knowest thou not? and how the chief
Of joys seems--not to suffer pain?

Know'st thou not at the fall of the leaf
How the soul feels like a dried sheaf
Bound up at length for harvesting,
And how death seems a comely thing
In Autumn at the fall of the leaf?

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

--Did You Know: (12 May 1828 – 9 April 1882) Rossetti was an English poet, illustrator, painter and translator. He was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 and was later to be the main inspiration for second generation of artists and writers influenced by the movement. He was also a major precursor of the Aesthetic movement. Rossetti's art was characterised by its sensuality and its medieval revivalism. His early poetry was influenced by Keats. His later poetry was characterised by the complex interlinking of thought and feeling, especially in his sonnet sequence The House of Life. Rossetti's personal life was closely linked to his work, especially his relationships with his models and muses Elizabeth Siddal and Jane Morris. Read more at .... Dante Rossetti

--Word of the Day: abeyance \uh-BAY-uhn(t)s\, noun:
Suspension; temporary cessation.
Example:
He was nineteen years old, and officially a medical student, though inevitably his studies were in abeyance for the duration of the war.
-Ruth Brandon, Surreal Lives: The Surrealists 1917-1945

--Quote of the Day: Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it, and if I were a bird I would fly about the earth seeking the successive autumns.
-George Eliot

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What's the second most populous continent?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
Who said: "I'm the president of the United States and I'm not going to eat any more broccoli"?
Answer: George Bush

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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November 14, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 11/9-11/13/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? Which poets are your favorites?  Leave a comment with your  thoughts, and let me know which classic you would like to see. The two, terrific poems of the week for me were:

--An Irish Airman Foresees His Death and --Love Is Enough

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below. Just click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
November 9, 2009
Spring Wind in London
--Description: 20th C, Mansfield K., Nature, Seasons--



November 10, 2009
Prayer For A New Mother
--Description: 20th C, Parker D., Childhood, Christianity, Love, Parenting--


November 11, 2009
An Irish Airman Foresees His Death
--Description: 20th C, Yeats, W.B., Death, Life, Patriotism--


November 12, 2009
My Lady Looks So Gentle and So Pure
--Description: 14th C, Alighieri D., Adoration, Beauty, Love, Sonnet--


November 13, 2009
Love Is Enough
--Description: 20th C, Wilcox E.W., Contentment, Love--



--------------------------------------
Weekend Haiku:

"Notes ripple like lace
Tender, heartbreaking music
Hearts cry in response."

V. Mahfood

--------------------------------------

--Word of the Day: loquacious \loh-KWAY-shuhs\, adjective:
1. Very talkative.
2. Full of excessive talk; wordy.
Example:
The meeting went on for hours, accommodating loquacious bores who were each allowed their say.
--Andrew Sullivan, "Gay Life, Gay Death", The New Republic, December 17, 1990

--Quote of the Day: If you look deep enough you will see music; the heart of nature being everywhere music.
-Thomas Carlyle

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: Who said: "I'm the president of the United States and I'm not going to eat any more broccoli"?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What future Soviet dictator was training to be a priest when he got turned on to Marxism?
Answer: Joseph Stalin

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


Submit a poem on Coffee Table Poetry's GUEST BOOK FOR POETS

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