August 31, 2009

Why Do I Love You, Sir?

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A charming poem to flavor your day!

--Description: 19th C, Dickinson E., Love, Nature--

"Why do I love" You, Sir?
Because—
The Wind does not require the Grass
To answer—Wherefore when He pass
She cannot keep Her place.

Because He knows—and
Do not You—
And We know not—
Enough for Us
The Wisdom it be so—

The Lightning—never asked an Eye
Wherefore it shut—when He was by—
Because He knows it cannot speak—
And reasons not contained—
—Of Talk—
There be—preferred by Daintier Folk—

The Sunrise—Sire—compelleth Me—
Because He's Sunrise—and I see—
Therefore—Then—
I love Thee—

Emily Dickinson

..Dedicated to my beloved Sir..

--Did You Know: December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After she studied at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence. Although Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation. Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring topics in letters to her friends.

--Word of the Day: saturnine\SAT-uhr-nyn\, adjective:
1. Born under or being under the astrological influence of the planet Saturn.
2. Gloomy or sullen in disposition.
3. Having a sardonic or bitter aspect.
Quote:
His saturnine spirit appealed to younger bohemians who were anxious to make idols of an earlier generation's tormented souls, but even so, it cannot have been easy for Rothko always to be the pessimist among the optimists.
-Jed Perl, review of Mark Rothko: A Biography by James E.B. Breslin, New Republic, January 24, 1994

--Quote of the Day: In seeking wisdom thou art wise; in imagining that thou hast attained it - thou art a fool.
Lord Chesterfield

--Spanish Word of the Day: interés, (noun m.):
interest
(eg) los intereses devengados desde el día 1 de mayo de este año
(transl) interest accrued since 1 May this year
(eg) el pago de intereses de la deuda exterior
(transl) payment of interest on the foreign debt
(eg) Hay intereses ecónomicos por medio.
(transl) There are financial interests involved.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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August 27, 2009

To A Skylark

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May your thoughts soar with joy today!


--Description: 19th C, Shelley P.B., Joy, Life, Nature --



Hail to thee, blithe Spirit!
Bird thou never wert,
That from Heaven, or near it,
Pourest thy full heart
In profuse strains of unpremeditated art.

Higher still and higher
From the earth thou springest
Like a cloud of fire;
The blue deep thou wingest,
And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest.

In the golden lightning
Of the sunken sun,
O'er which clouds are bright'ning,
Thou dost float and run;
Like an unbodied joy whose race is just begun.

The pale purple even
Melts around thy flight;
Like a star of Heaven,
In the broad daylight
Thou art unseen, but yet I hear thy shrill delight,

Keen as are the arrows
Of that silver sphere
Whose intense lamp narrows
In the white dawn clear
Until we hardly see -- we feel, that it is there.

All the earth and air
With thy voice is loud,
As, when night is bare,
From one lonely cloud
The moon rains out her beams, and Heaven is overflowed.

What thou art we know not;
What is most like thee?
From rainbow clouds there flow not
Drops so bright to see
As from thy presence showers a rain of melody.

Like a poet hidden
In the light of thought,
Singing hymns unbidden,
Till the world is wrought
To sympathy with hopes and fears it heeded not:

Like a high-born maiden
In a palace tower,
Soothing her love-laden
Soul in secret hour
With music sweet as love, which overflows her bower:

Like a glow-worm golden
In a dell of dew,
Scattering unbeholden
Its aërial hue
Among the flowers and grass, which screen it from the view:

Like a rose embowered
In its own green leaves,
By warm winds deflowered,
Till the scent it gives
Makes faint with too much sweet these heavy-wingèd thieves.

Sound of vernal showers
On the twinkling grass,
Rain-awakened flowers,
All that ever was,
Joyous, and clear, and fresh, thy music doth surpass:

Teach us, Sprite or Bird,
What sweet thoughts are thine:
I have never heard
Praise of love or wine
That panted forth a flood of rapture so divine.

Chorus Hymeneal,
Or triumphal chant,
Matched with thine would be all
But an empty vaunt,
A thing wherein we feel there is some hidden want.

What objects are the fountains
Of thy happy strain?
What fields, or waves, or mountains?
What shapes of sky or plain?
What love of thine own kind? what ignorance of pain?

With thy clear keen joyance,
Languor cannot be:
Shadow of annoyance
Never came near thee:
Thou lovest -- but ne'er knew love's sad satiety.

Waking or asleep,
Thou of death must deem
Things more true and deep
Than we mortals dream,
Or how could thy notes flow in such a crystal stream?

We look before and after,
And pine for what is not:
Our sincerest laughter
With some pain is fraught;
Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought.

Yet, if we could scorn
Hate, and pride, and fear;
If we were things born
Not to shed a tear,
I know not how thy joy we ever should come near.

Better than all measures
Of delightful sound,
Better than all treasures
That in books are found,
Thy skill to poet were, thou scorner of the ground!

Teach me half the gladness
That thy brain must know,
Such harmonious madness
From my lips would flow
The world should listen then -- as I am listening now.

Percy Bysshe Shelley

--Did You Know: (4 August 1792 – 8 July 1822) Shelley was one of the major English Romantic poets and is critically regarded among the finest lyric poets in the English language. He is most famous for such classic anthology verse works as Ozymandias, Ode to the West Wind, To a Skylark, and The Masque of Anarchy, which are among the most popular and critically acclaimed poems in the English language. His major works, however, are long visionary poems which included Prometheus Unbound, Alastor, Adonaïs, The Revolt of Islam, and the unfinished The Triumph of Life. The Cenci (1819) and Prometheus Unbound (1820) were dramatic plays in five and four acts respectively. He also wrote the Gothic novels Zastrozzi (1810) and St. Irvyne (1811) and the short works The Assassins (1814) and The Coliseum (1817).
Shelley's unconventional life and uncompromising idealism, combined with his strong disapproving voice, made him an authoritative and much-denigrated figure during his life and afterward. He became an idol of the next two or three or even four generations of poets.

--Word of the Day: perorate\PUR-uh-rayt\, intransitive verb:
1. To conclude or sum up a long discourse.
2. To speak or expound at length; to declaim.
Quote:
These people don't talk, they perorate, pontificate, bombast.
-Jean Charbonneau, "Biographer's quest becomes self-searching journey", Denver Post, January 28, 2001

--Quote of the Day: Faith is taking the first step even when you don't see the whole staircase.
-Martin Luther King, Jr.

--Spanish Word of the Day: ordenado, (adjective):
tidy; organized
(eg) Tu habitación esta muy ordenada hoy, Carlos.
(transl) You’re room is very tidy today, Carlos.
(eg) Es una persona sumamente ordenada.
(transl) He’s a supremely organized person.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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August 26, 2009

If I Could Tell You

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--Description: 20th C, Auden W.H., Love --

Time will say nothing but I told you so,
Time only knows the price we have to pay;
If I could tell you I would let you know.

If we should weep when clowns put on their show,
If we should stumble when musicians play,
Time will say nothing but I told you so.

There are no fortunes to be told, although,
Because I love you more than I can say,
If I could tell you I would let you know.

The winds must come from somewhere when they blow,
There must be reasons why the leaves decay;
Time will say nothing but I told you so.

Perhaps the roses really want to grow,
The vision seriously intends to stay;
If I could tell you I would let you know.

Suppose the lions all get up and go,
And all the brooks and soldiers run away;
Will Time say nothing but I told you so?
If I could tell you I would let you know.

Auden W.H.

--Did You Know: (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) Auden grew up in Birmingham in a professional middle-class family and read English literature at Christ Church, Oxford. His early poems, written in the late 1920s and early 1930s, alternated between telegraphic modern styles and fluent traditional ones, were written in an intense and dramatic tone. He signed his works W. H. Auden and was an Anglo-American poet, born in England, later an American citizen, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century.His work is noted for its stylistic and technical achievements, its engagement with moral and political issues, and its variety of tone, form and content. The central themes of his poetry are love, politics and citizenship, religion and morals, and the relationship between unique human beings and the anonymous, impersonal world of nature.

--Word of the Day: undulation \uhn-juh-LEY-shuhn, uhn-dyuh-, -duh-\, noun:
1. A regular rising and falling or movement to alternating sides; movement in waves.
2. A wavelike form, outline, or appearance.
3. One of a series of waves or wavelike segments.
Considering the difficulty of the golf course, the severe undulation of the greens, the magnitude of the event and the quality of the competition, Inkster ranked it as her greatest victory, particularly because she turned 42 last month.
--Clifton Brown, "GOLF; One for the Ages, As Inkster Wins U.S. Open at 42", New York Times, July 8, 2004

--Quote of the Day: All the art of living lies in a fine mingling of letting go and holding on.
-Henry Ellis

--French Word of the Day: se souvenir, se rappeler - remember
1. transitive verb
1. (recall) se souvenir de, se rappeler (fact, name, place, event);
se souvenir de (person);
to ~ doing se rappeler avoir fait, se souvenir d'avoir fait;
2. (not forget) to ~ to do penser à faire, ne pas oublier de faire.
2. intransitive verb se souvenir.
Quote:
(eg) Essaie de te rappeler ce qui s'est passé.
(transl) Try to remember exactly what happened.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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August 22, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 8/18-8/21/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week, it's time to re-discover all the beautiful things written. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? The two, terrific poems of the week for me were:

--Ephemera and A Nursery Darling--

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below, and click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
August 18, 2009
Ephemera
--Description: 20th C, Yeats, W. B., Love, Separation--


August 19, 2009
The Trouble With Snowmen
--Description: 21st, McGough R., Aging, Holidays, Nature, Seasons--


August 20, 2009
A Meditation For His Mistress
--Description: 17th C, Herrick R., Aging, Love, Nature, Seasons--


August 21, 2009
A Nursery Darling
--Description: 19th C, Carroll L., Childhood, Parenting--


--Word of the Day: parlous\PAR-luhs\, adjective:
1. Attended with peril; fraught with danger; hazardous.
Quotes:
It was a parlous time on the Continent, when Communists and fascists vied brutally for supremacy.
-Howard Simons, "Shots Seen Round the World", New York Times, September 22, 1985

--Quote of the Day: "You are the bows from which your children as living arrows are sent forth."
-Kahlil Gibran

--Spanish Word of the Day: madrugar, (verb):
to get up early
(eg) No soporto madrugar.
(transl) I can’t stand getting up early.
(eg) Usted debe madrugarmucho.
(transl) You must be an early riser.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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August 17, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 8/10-8/15/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week, it's time to re-discover all the beautiful things written. Here is a recap, and my two favorite poems of the week. What were YOURS? The two, terrific poems of the week for me:

--Delight in Disorder and Flower Gathering--

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below, and click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
August 10, 2009
Life in a Love
--Description: 19th C, Browning R., Love, Passion--


August 11, 2009
You and I
--Description: 21st, McGough R., Love--


August 12, 2009
Flower God, God of Spring
--Description: 19th C, Stevenson R.L., Music, Nature, Seasons--


August 13, 2009
Delight in Disorder
--Description: 17th C, Herrick R., Love, Sonnet-->


August 14, 2009
Soil
--Description: 21st C, McGough R., Aging, Childhood, Nature, Seasons--



August 15, 2009
Flower Gathering
--Description: 20th C, Frost R., Love, Nature, Seasons--



--Word of the Day: celerity\suh-LAIR-uh-tee\, noun:
1. Rapidity of motion or action; quickness; swiftness.
Quotes:
Though not in the best of physical form, he was capable of moving with celerity.
-Malachy McCourt, A Monk Swimming: A Memoir

--Quote of the Day: Then this immensive cup
Of aromatic wine,
Catullus, I quaff up
To that terse muse of thine.
-Robert Herrick,

--Spanish Word of the Day: conocer, (verb):
to know
(eg) La conozco.
(transl) I know her.
(eg) Conozco bien París.
(transl) I know Paris well.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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August 16, 2009

Sailing to Byzantium

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--Description: 20th C, Yeats W.B., Aging, Fantasy, Life--


I
That is no country for old men. The young
In one another's arms, birds in the trees
---Those dying generations---at their song,
The salmon-falls, the mackerel-crowded seas,
Fish, flesh, or fowl commend all summer long
Whatever is begotten, born, and dies.
Caught in that sensual music all neglect
Monuments of unaging intellect.

II
An aged man is but a paltry thing,
A tattered coat upon a stick, unless
Soul clap its hands and sing, and louder sing
For every tatter in its mortal dress,
Nor is there singing school but studying
Monuments of its own magnificence;
And therefore I have sailed the seas and come
To the holy city of Byzantium.

III
O sages standing in God's holy fire
As in the gold mosaic of a wall,
Come from the holy fire, perne in a gyre,
And be the singing-masters of my soul.
Consume my heart away; sick with desire
And fastened to a dying animal
It knows not what it is; and gather me
Into the artifice of eternity.

IV
Once out of nature I shall never take
My bodily form from any natural thing,
But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths make
Of hammered gold and gold enamelling
To keep a drowsy Emperor awake;
Or set upon a golden bough to sing
To lords and ladies of Byzantium
Of what is past, or passing, or to come.

W. B. Yeats

Especially liked by @maudy103.

--Did You Know: (13 June 1865–28 January 1939) Yeats was an Anglo-Irish poet and dramatist and one of the foremost figures of 20th-century literature. A pillar of both the Irish and British literary establishments, in his later years Yeats served as an Irish Senator for two terms. He was a driving force behind the Irish Literary Revival, and along with Lady Gregory and Edward Martyn founded the Abbey Theatre, and served as its chief during its early years. In 1923, he was awarded a Nobel Prize in Literature for what the Nobel Committee described as "inspired poetry, which in a highly artistic form gives expression to the spirit of a whole nation;" and he was the first Irishman so honored. He studied poetry in his youth, and from an early age was fascinated by both Irish legends and the occult. Those topics feature in the first phase of his work, which lasted roughly until the turn of the century. His earliest volume of verse was published in 1889, and those slowly paced and lyrical poems display debts to Edmund Spenser and Percy Bysshe Shelley, as well as to the lyricism of the Pre-Raphaelite poets. From 1900, Yeats' poetry grew more physical and realistic.

--Word of the Day: jocund\JOCK-uhnd; JOH-kuhnd , adjective:
Full of or expressing high-spirited merriment; light-hearted; mirthful.
Quotes:
His careless manners and jocund repartees might well seem incompatible with anything serious.
-William Prescott, History of the Conquest of Mexico

--Quote of the Day: The great critic...must be a philosopher, for from philosophy he will learn serenity, impartiality, and the transitoriness of human things.
-W. Somerset Maugham, The Summing Up, ch. 60, 1938

--French Word of the Day: la philosophie, (noun f.) toute connaissance par la raison

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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August 14, 2009

Soil

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--Description: 21st C, McGough R., Aging, Childhood, Nature, Seasons--


We've ignored each other for a long time
and I'm strictly an indoor man
anytime to call would be the wrong time
I'll avoid you as long as I can

When I was a boy we were good friends
I made pies out of you when you were wet
And in childhood's remembered summer weather
We roughandtumbled together
We were very close

just you and me and the sun
the world a place for having fun
always so much to be done

But gradually I grew away from you
Of course you were still there
During my earliest sexcapades
When I roughandfumbled
Not very well after bedtime
But suddenly it was winter
And you seemed so cold and dirty
That I stayed indoors and acquired
A taste for girls and clean clothes

we found less and less to say
you were jealous so one day
I simply upped and moved away

I still called to see you on occasions
But we had little now in common
And my visits grew less frequent
Until finally
One coldbright April morning
A handful of you drummed
On my fathers waxworked coffin

at last it all made sense
there was no need for pretence
you said nothing in defense

And now recently
While traveling from town to town
Past where you live
I have become increasingly aware
Of you watching me out there.
Patient and unforgiving
Toying with the trees.

we've avoided each other for a long time
and I'm strictly a city man
anytime to call would be the wrong time
I'll avoid you as long as I can

Roger McGough

--Did You Know: (born 9 November 1937) McGough is a well-known English performance poet. He presents the BBC Radio 4 programme Poetry Please and records voice-overs for commercials, as well as performing his own poetry regularly. One of McGough's more unusual compositions was created in 1981, when he co-wrote an "electronic poem" called Now Press Return with the programmer Richard Warner for inclusion with the Welcome Tape of the BBC Micro home computer. Now Press Return incorporated several novel themes, including user-defined elements to the poem, lines which changed their order (and meaning) every few seconds, and text which wrote itself in a spiral around the screen. McGough won a Cholmondeley Award in 1998, and was awarded the CBE in June 2004.[8] He holds an honorary MA from Nene College of Further Education;[citation needed] was awarded an honorary degree from Roehampton University in 2006;[citation needed] as well as an honorary doctorate from the University of Liverpool on 3 July 2006

--Word of the Day: ennui, en⋅nui/ɑnˈwi, ˈɑnwi; Fr. ɑ̃ˈnwi/(noun)
Pronunciation [ahn-wee, ahn-wee; Fr. ahn-nwee]
A feeling of weariness and dissatisfaction arising from lack of interest; boredom.
Quote:
He glanced at his heavily laden bookshelves. Nothing there appealed to him. The ennui seemed to have settled into his very bones.
-Amanda Quick, With This Ring

--Quote of the Day: Dreams are today's answers to tomorrow's questions.
-Edgar Cayce

--French Word of the Day: le jardin (noun m.) garden
(eg) Ces oignons viennent du jardin derrière la maison.
(transl) These onions are from the garden in my backyard.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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August 13, 2009

Delight in Disorder

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--Description: 17th C, Herrick R., Love, Sonnet--


A sweet disorder in the dress
Kindles in clothes a wantonness:
A lawn about the shoulders thrown
Into a fine distraction:
An erring lace, which here and there
Enthralls the crimson stomacher:
A cuff neglectful, and thereby
Ribbands to flow confusedly:
A winning wave (deserving note)
In the tempestuous petticoat:
A careless shoe-string, in whose tie
I see a wild civility:
Do more bewitch me, than when art
Is too precise in every part.

Robert Herrick

--Did You Know: (baptized 24 August 1591 – buried 15 October 1674)Herrick was a 17th century English poet. Born in Cheapside, London, he was the seventh child and fourth son of Nicholas Herrick, a prosperous goldsmith, who fell out of a window when Robert was a year old (whether this was suicide remains unclear). The tradition that Herrick received his education at Westminster is groundless. It is more likely that (like his uncle's children) he attended The Merchant Taylors' School. In 1607 he became apprenticed to his uncle, Sir William Herrick, who was a goldsmith and jeweler to the king. The apprenticeship ended after only six years when Herrick, at age twenty-two, matriculated at St John's College, Cambridge. He graduated in 1617. Robert Herrick became a member of the Sons of Ben, a group centered upon an admiration for the works of Ben Jonson. The Victorian poet Swinburne described Herrick as the greatest song writer...ever born of English race. It is certainly true that despite his use of classical allusions and names, his poems are easier for modern readers to understand than those of many of his contemporaries.

--Word of the Day: peradventure\puhr-uhd-VEN-chuhr; pehr-\, adverb:
1. [Archaic] Possibly; perhaps.
noun:
1. Chance, uncertainty, or doubt.
Quote:
It establishes beyond any peradventure of doubt that they were all wet and all wrong in their reports about the weapons of mass destruction, the chemical weapons, the biological weapons and the coming nuclear weapons as well.
-Daniel Schorr, "interview Weekend Edition - Saturday, with Susan Stamberg", National Public Radio, July 10, 2004

--Quote of the Day: A friendship can weather most things and thrive in thin soil; but it needs a little mulch of letters and phone calls and small, silly presents every so often - just to save it from drying out completely.
-Pam Brown

--Spanish Word of the Day: cuadro, noun:
painting; picture; table, chart
Cuadro means both a painting, as in:
(eg) un cuadro de Picasso
(transl) a painting by Picasso
(eg) ¿Quién pintó ese cuadro?
(transl) Who did that painting?

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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August 12, 2009

Flower God, God of the Spring

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Though it be summer, may your heart be filled with spring cheer!
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--Description: 19th C, Stevenson R.L., Music, Nature, Seasons--


Flower god, god of the spring, beautiful, bountiful,
Cold-dyed shield in the sky, lover of versicles,
Here I wander in April
Cold, grey-headed; and still to my
Heart, Spring comes with a bound, Spring the deliverer,
Spring, song-leader in woods, chorally resonant;
Spring, flower-planter in meadows,
Child-conductor in willowy
Fields deep dotted with bloom, daisies and crocuses:
Here that child from his heart drinks of eternity:
O child, happy are children!

She still smiles on their innocence,
She, dear mother in God, fostering violets,
Fills earth full of her scents, voices and violins:
Thus one cunning in music
Wakes old chords in the memory:
Thus fair earth in the Spring leads her performances.
One more touch of the bow, smell of the virginal
Green - one more, and my bosom
Feels new life with an ecstasy.


Robert Louis Stevenson

--Did You Know: (13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894) Stevenson was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer. Stevenson was greatly admired by many authors, including Jorge Luis Borges, Ernest Hemingway and Rudyard Kipling.He made long and frequent trips to the neighbourhood of the Forest of Fontainebleau, staying at Barbizon, Grez-sur-Loing and Nemours, becoming a member of the artists' colonies there, as well as to Paris to visit galleries and the theatres. He did qualify for the Scottish bar in July 1875; and his father added a brass plate with "R. L. Stevenson, Advocate" to the Heriot Row house. But although his law studies would influence his books, he never practised law. All his energies were now in travel and writing.

--Word of the Day: blandishment\BLAN-dish-muhnt\, noun:
1. Speech or action that flatters and tends to coax, entice, or persuade; allurement -- often used in the plural.
Quote:
But she had not risen at all to the law fellow's blandishments, his attempts to interest her in his ideas and persuade her to set forth her own.
-John Bayley, Elegy for Iris

--Quote of the Day: Youth is like spring, an over-praised season more remarkable for biting winds than genial breezes. Autumn is the mellower season, and what we lose in flowers we more than gain in fruits.
-Samuel Butler,

--Spanish Word of the Day: resaltar, verb:
to stand out; to highlight
(eg) El aspecto en el que resaltó más fue sin duda la política exterior.
(transl) The aspect in which he stood out most was undoubtedly foreign policy.
(eg) Resaltó la importancia de la democracia.
(transl) He highlighted the importance of democracy.

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August 11, 2009

You and I

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--Description: 21st, McGough R., Love --


I explain quietly. You
hear me shouting. You
try a new tack. I
feel old wounds reopen.

You see both sides. I
see your blinkers. I
am placatory. You
sense a new selfishness.

I am a dove. You
recognize the hawk. You
offer an olive branch. I
feel the thorns.

You bleed. I
see crocodile tears. I
withdraw. You
reel from the impact.

Roger McGough

--Did You Know: (born 9 November 1937) McGough is a well-known English performance poet. He presents the BBC Radio 4 programme Poetry Please and records voice-overs for commercials, as well as performing his own poetry regularly. He is a Fellow of Liverpool John Moores University and is a Vice President of the Poetry Society. McGough was responsible for much of the humorous dialogue in The Beatles' animated film, Yellow Submarine, although he did not receive an on-screen credit. At about the same time a selection of his poems was published, along with work from Adrian Henri and Brian Patten, in a best-selling paperback volume of verse entitled The Mersey Sound, first published in 1967, revised in 1983 and again in 2007.

--Word of the Day: insouciant\in-SOO-see-uhnt; Fr. an-soo-SYAHN\, adjective:
1. Marked by lighthearted unconcern or indifference; carefree; nonchalant.
Quote:
The insouciant gingerbread man skips through the pages with glee, until he meets his . . . demise at the end.
-Judith Constantinides, "The Gingerbread Man", School Library Journal, April 2002

--Quote of the Day: I have learned that only two things are necessary to keep one's wife happy. First, let her think she's having her own way. And second, let her have it.
-Lyndon B. Johnson

--French Word of the Day: le mariage (noun m.) marriage
(eg) L'institution du mariage a peu changé au cours des siècles.
(transl) The institution of marriage has changed little over the centuries.
broken marriage- mariage brisé
by marriage- par mariage
civil marriage- mariage civil
common-law marriage- concubinage (Juridique)
dissolution of marriage-dissolution de mariage

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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