July 29, 2009

The Schoolboy

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--Description: 19th C, Blake W., Children, Nature, Seasons--


I love to rise in a summer morn,
When the birds sing on every tree;
The distant huntsman winds his horn,
And the skylark sings with me:
O what sweet company!

But to go to school in a summer morn, —
O it drives all joy away!
Under a cruel eye outworn,
The little ones spend the day
In sighing and dismay.

Ah then at times I drooping sit,
And spend many an anxious hour;
Nor in my book can I take delight,
Nor sit in learning’s bower,
Worn through with the dreary shower.

How can the bird that is born for joy
Sit in a cage and sing?
How can a child, when fears annoy,
But droop his tender wing,
And forget his youthful spring!

O father and mother if buds are nipped,
And blossoms blown away;
And if the tender plants are stripped
Of their joy in the springing day,
By sorrow and care’s dismay, —

How shall the summer arise in joy,
Or the summer fruits appear?
Or how shall we gather what griefs destroy,
Or bless the mellowing year,
When the blasts of winter appear?

William Blake

--Did You Know: (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) Blake was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. Blake claimed to experience visions throughout his life. They were often associated with beautiful religious themes and imagery, and therefore may have inspired him further with spiritual works and pursuits. Certainly, religious concepts and imagery figure centrally in Blake's works. God and Christianity constituted the intellectual centre of his writings, from which he drew inspiration.

--Word of the Day: effulgence\i-FUL-juhn(t)s\, noun:
1.The state of being bright and radiant; splendor; brilliance.
See the full Dictionary.com entry |See Synonyms on Thesaurus.com
Quotes:
The purity of his private character gave effulgence to his public virtues.
-"Congressman Henry Lee's Eulogy for George Washington", , December 4, 1908

--Quote of the Day: The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.
-Albert Einstein

--French Word of the Day: childhood (noun) l'enfance f;
in (his) early ~ dans sa prime enfance.
(eg) Il eut une enfance difficile à cause de l'alcoolisme de son père.
(transl) His childhood was difficult because his father was an alcoholic.

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July 28, 2009

Summer

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--Description: 19th C, Clare J., Love, Nature, Seasons--


Come we to the summer, to the summer we will come,
For the woods are full of bluebells and the hedges full of bloom,
And the crow is on the oak a-building of her nest,
And love is burning diamonds in my true lover’s breast;
She sits beneath the whitethorn a-plaiting of her hair,
And I will to my true lover with a fond request repair;
I will look upon her face, I will in her beauty rest,
And lay my aching weariness upon her lovely breast.

The clock-a-clay is creeping on the open bloom of May,
The merry bee is trampling the pinky threads all day,
And the chaffinch it is brooding on its grey mossy nest
In the whitethorn bush where I will lean upon my lover’s breast;
I’ll lean upon her breast and I’ll whisper in her ear
That I cannot get a wink o’sleep for thinking of my dear;
I hunger at my meat and I daily fade away
Like the hedge rose that is broken in the heat of the day.

John Clare

--Did You Know: (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) Clare was an English poet, born the son of a farm labourer who came to be known for his representations of the English countryside. His poetry underwent a major re-evaluation in the late 20th century and he is often now considered to be among the most important 19th-century poets. In his early adult years, Clare became a pot-boy in the Blue Bell public house and fell in love with Mary Joyce; but her father, a prosperous farmer, forbade her to meet him. Subsequently he was a gardener at Burghley House. He enlisted in the militia, tried camp life with Gypsies, and worked in Pickworth as a lime burner in 1817. Malnutrition stemming from childhood may be the main culprit behind his 5-foot stature and may have contributed to his poor physical health in later life.

--Word of the Day: euphonious\yoo-FOH-nee-uhs , adjective:
1. Pleasing or sweet in sound; smooth-sounding.
Quote:
She combines alliteration and deft word choices with the grace of an oral storyteller, creating euphonious and precise sentences that are perfect for reading aloud.
-Amy L. Cohn, "Children's Books", New York Times, March 10, 1991

--Quote of the Day: Summer is a promissory note signed in June, its long days spent and gone before you know it, and due to be repaid next January.
-Hal Borland

--Spanish Word of the Day: explicarse, (verb):
to express yourself, to explain (yourself)
(eg) Se explica con mucha claridad.
(transl) He expresses himself very clearly.
(eg) No sé si me explico. Lo que quiero decir es que ...
(transl) I’m not sure I’m making myself clear. What I mean is that ...

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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July 25, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 7/18-7/24/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week, it's time to re-discover all the beautiful things written. Here is a recap, and my  two favorite poems of the week.  What were YOURS? The two, terrific poems of the week for me in no particular order were:

--Desiderata and Passion --

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below, and click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
July 18, 2009
Cheerfulness Taught By Reason
--Description: 19th C, Browning E.B., Encouragement, Hope--


July 20, 2009
Desiderata
--Description: 20th C, Ehrmann, M., Encouragement, Hope, Peace--



July 21, 2009
An English Breeze
--Description: 19th C, Stevenson R.L ., Christianity, Nature, Patriotism--


July 22, 2009
Love Song
--Description: 20th C, Yeats W.B., Love, Nature


July 23, 2009
Passion
--Description: 19th C, Brontë C., Love, Passion--


July 24, 2009
The More Loving One
--Description: 20th C, Auden W.H., Love, Nature--


--Word of the Day: mellifluous \muh-LIF-loo-us\, adjective:
Flowing as with honey; smooth; flowing sweetly or smoothly; as, a mellifluous voice.
Quote:
The balladeer whose mellifluous voice serenaded two generations of lovers.
-Margo Jefferson, "Unforgettable", New York Times, December 26, 1999

--Quote of the Day: Everything starts with yourself -- with you making up your mind about what you're going to do with your life. I tell kids that it's a cruel world, and that the world will bend them either left or right, and it's up to them to decide which way to bend.
-Tony Dorsett

--French Word of the Day: melodic (adj)
melodic (adj) mélodique
melodic (musical) (adj) musical
melodic (pleasing melody)(adj) mélodieux
melodic line ligne mélodique

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader.Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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July 23, 2009

Passion

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--Description: 19th C, Brontë C., Love, Passion--


Some have won a wild delight,
By daring wilder sorrow;
Could I gain thy love to-night,
I'd hazard death to-morrow.

Could the battle-struggle earn
One kind glance from thine eye,
How this withering heart would burn,
The heady fight to try!

Welcome nights of broken sleep,
And days of carnage cold,
Could I deem that thou wouldst weep
To hear my perils told.

Tell me, if with wandering bands
I roam full far away,
Wilt thou to those distant lands
In spirit ever stray?

Wild, long, a trumpet sounds afar;
Bid me--bid me go
Where Seik and Briton meet in war,
On Indian Sutlej's flow.

Blood has dyed the Sutlej's waves
With scarlet stain, I know;
Indus' borders yawn with graves,
Yet, command me go!

Though rank and high the holocaust
Of nations steams to heaven,
Glad I'd join the death-doomed host,
Were but the mandate given.

Passion's strength should nerve my arm,
Its ardour stir my life,
Till human force to that dread charm
Should yield and sink in wild alarm,
Like trees to tempest-strife.

If, hot from war, I seek thy love,
Darest thou turn aside?
Darest thou then my fire reprove,
By scorn, and maddening pride?

No--my will shall yet control
Thy will, so high and free,
And love shall tame that haughty soul--
Yes--tenderest love for me.

I'll read my triumph in thine eyes,
Behold, and prove the change;
Then leave, perchance, my noble prize,
Once more in arms to range.

I'd die when all the foam is up,
The bright wine sparkling high;
Nor wait till in the exhausted cup
Life's dull dregs only lie.

Then Love thus crowned with sweet reward,
Hope blest with fulness large,
I'd mount the saddle, draw the sword,
And perish in the charge!


Charlotte Brontë

--Did You Know: (21 April 1816 – 31 March 1855) Brontë was a British novelist, the eldest of the three famous Brontë sisters whose novels have become standards of English literature. Charlotte Brontë, who used the pen name Currer Bell, is best known for Jane Eyre, one of the most famous English novels. Charlotte was born in Thornton, Yorkshire, England, in 1816, the third of six children, to Patrick Brontë (formerly "Patrick Brunty"), an Irish Anglican clergyman, and his wife, Maria Branwell. At home in Haworth Parsonage, Charlotte and the other surviving children — Branwell, Emily and Anne — began chronicling the lives and struggles of the inhabitants of their imaginary kingdoms. Charlotte and Branwell wrote Byronic stories about their country — Angria — and Emily and Anne wrote articles and poems about theirs — Gondal. The sagas were elaborate and convoluted (and still exist in part manuscripts) and provided them with an obsessive interest in childhood and early adolescence, which prepared them for their literary vocations in adulthood.

--Word of the Day: pastiche\pas-TEESH; pahs-\, noun:
1. A work of art that imitates the style of some previous work.
2. A musical, literary, or artistic composition consisting of selections from various works.
3. A hodgepodge; an incongruous combination of different styles and ingredients.
See the full Dictionary.com entry |See Synonyms on Thesaurus.com
Quote:
The figure was a pastiche, assembled from fragments: a Greek head, a Roman imperial cuirass, and halo, limbs, weapons, and crocodile fashioned by a Venetian craftsman.
-Patricia Fortini Brown, Venice and Antiquity

--Quote of the Day: Now nature is not at variance with art, nor art with nature; they being both the servants of his providence. Art is the perfection of nature. Were the world now as it was the sixth day, there were yet a chaos. Nature hath made one world, and art another. In brief, all things are artificial; for nature is the art of God.
-Sir Thomas Browne

--French Word of the Day: artist (noun..mf) l'artiste
(eg) Cette artiste travaille le métal, le plâtre et la peinture.
(transl) This artist works in metal, plaster and paints.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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July 22, 2009

Love Song

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--Description: 20th C, Yeats W.B., Love, Nature

My love, we will go, we will go, I and you,
And away in the woods we will scatter the dew;
And the salmon behold, and the ousel too,
My love, we will hear, I and you, we will hear,
The calling afar of the doe and the deer.
And the bird in the branches will cry for us clear,
And the cuckoo unseen in his festival mood;
And death, oh my fair one, will never come near
In the bosom afar of the fragrant wood.

William Butler Yeats

--Did You Know: (13 June 1865–28 January 1939) Yeats was an Irish poet and dramatist and one of the foremost figures of 20th-century literature. A pillar of both the Irish and British literary establishments, in his later years Yeats served as an Irish Senator for two terms. In 1923, he was awarded a Nobel Prize in Literature for what the Nobel Committee described as "inspired poetry, which in a highly artistic form gives expression to the spirit of a whole nation;" and he was the first Irishman so honored.

--Word of the Day: sedulous\SEJ-uh-luhs\, adjective:
1. Diligent in application or pursuit; steadily industrious.
2. Characterized by or accomplished with care and perseverance.
Quote:
He did not attain this distinction by accident but by sedulous study from the cradle forward.
-Alexander Cockburn and Jeffrey St. Clair, Al Gore: A User's Manual

--Quote of the Day: The deepest definition of youth is life as yet untouched by tragedy.
-Alfred North Whitehead

--Spanish Word of the Day: pensar, (verb):
to think about, to think over
(eg) Piénsalo bien antes de responder.
(transl) Think carefully before you answer.
(eg) No estoy muy convencida. Lo voy a pensar.
(transl) I’m not totally convinced. I’ll think it over.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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July 20, 2009

Desiderata

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--Description: 20th C, Ehrmann, M., Encouragement, Hope, Peace--

Go placidly amid the noise and the haste,
and remember what peace there may be in silence.

As far as possible, without surrender,
be on good terms with all persons.
Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
and listen to others,
even to the dull and the ignorant;
they too have their story.
Avoid loud and aggressive persons;
they are vexatious to the spirit.

If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain or bitter,
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.
Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.

Exercise caution in your business affairs,
for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals,
and everywhere life is full of heroism.
Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love,
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment,
it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.

Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.
You are a child of the universe
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be.
And whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life,
keep peace in your soul.

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.


Max Erhmann

--Did You Know: (September 26, 1872 - September 9, 1945) Ehrmann was an attorney and businessman of Terre Haute, Indiana, best known for his 1927 prose poem "Desiderata" (Latin: "things desired"). Ehrmann received a degree in English from DePauw University (1894) where he was a member of Delta Tau Delta's Beta Beta chapter.[3] Later he studied philosophy and law at Harvard.Ehrmann was of German descent; both his parents emigrated from Bavaria in the 1840s. Young Ehrmann was educated at the Terre Haute Fourth District School and the German Methodist Church.

--Word of the Day: leitmotif\LYT-moh-teef\, noun:
1. In music drama, a marked melodic phrase or short passage which always accompanies the reappearance of a certain person, situation, abstract idea, or allusion in the course of the play; a sort of musical label.
2. A dominant and recurring theme.
Quotes:
Each actor to appear on stage is accompanied by a musical phrase on the drum -- a sort of leitmotif to characterize an emotion, much like a Wagnerian drama.
-Eleanor Blau, "Connecticut's Shakespeare", New York Times, July 9, 1982

--Quote of the Day: I would rather be able to appreciate things I can not have than to have things I am not able to appreciate.
-Elbert Hubbard

--French Word of the Day: appreciation
appreciation (gratefulness) nf la gratitude (reconnaissance)
appreciation (admiration) nf l'admiration (pour quelque chose)
appreciation (evaluation) nf l'appréciation (évaluation d'un prix, d'un objet)

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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July 17, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 7/11 - 7/16/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week, it's time to re-discover all the beautiful things written. Here is a recap, and my  two favorite poems of the week.  What were YOURS? The two, terrific poems of the week for me in no particular order were:

--The Jewels and Bright Star --

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below, and click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
July 11, 2009


The Jewels
--Description: 19th C, Baudelaire C., Love, Passion



July 13, 2009


Work Without Hope
--Description: 20th C, Taylor, S.C., Hope, Nature,



July 14, 2009


Bright Star
--Description: 20th C, Keats J., Nature, Night, Sonnet



July 15, 2009


I Saw In Louisiana A Live-Oak Growing
--Description: 19th C, Whitman W., Friendship, Hope, Nature



July 16, 2009


Meet Me In The Green Glen
--Description: 19th C, Clare J., Love, Nature



--Word of the Day: dulcet\DUHL-sit\, adjective:
1. Pleasing to the ear; melodious; harmonious.
2. Generally pleasing, soothing, or agreeable.
3. (Archaic) Sweet to the taste.
Quotes:
If you want to catch up with our most famous songster, the nightingale, just visit Minsmere at the end of April, or early May, and stand on the edge of the car park. You'll soon hear the dulcet tones of the poets' favourite bird.
-Stephen Moss, "Birdwatch", The Guardian, October 23, 2000

--Quote of the Day: I'd never met a woman I considered as intelligent as me. That sounds bigheaded, but every woman I met was either a dolly-chick, or a sort of screwed-up intellectual chick. And of course, in the field I was in, I didn't meet many intellectual people anyway. I always had this dream of meeting an artist, an artist girl who would be like me. And I thought it was a myth, but then I met Yoko and that was it.
-John Lennon

--French Word of the Day: jewelry (noun) les bijoux (mpl);
(eg) la bijouterie f;
(transl) (in shop, workshop)
(eg) un bijou
a piece of jewelry

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July 16, 2009

Meet Me In The Green Glen

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--Description: 19th C, Clare J., Love, Nature

Love, meet me in the green glen,
Beside the tall elm-tree,
Where the sweetbriar smells so sweet agen;
There come with me.
Meet me in the green glen.

Meet me at the sunset
Down in the green glen,
Where we've often met
By hawthorn-tree and foxes' den,
Meet me in the green glen.

Meet me in the green glen,
By sweetbriar bushes there;
Meet me by your own sen,
Where the wild thyme blossoms fair.
Meet me in the green glen.

Meet me by the sweetbriar,
By the mole-hill swelling there;
When the west glows like a fire
God's crimson bed is there.
Meet me in the green glen.


John Clare

--Did You Know: (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) Clare was an English poet, born the son of a farm labourer who came to be known for his representations of the English countryside. In his time, Clare was commonly known as "the Northamptonshire Peasant Poet". Since his formal education was brief, Clare resisted the use of the increasingly-standardised English grammar and orthography in his poetry and prose. Many of his poems would come to incorporate terms used locally in his Northamptonshire dialect, such as 'pooty' (snail), 'lady-cow' (ladybird), 'crizzle' (to crisp) and 'throstle' (song thrush). In his early life he struggled to find a place for his poetry in the changing literary fashions of the day.

--Word of the Day: concomitant\kuhn-KOM-uh-tuhnt\, adjective:
1. Accompanying; attendant; occurring or existing concurrently.
noun:
1. Something that accompanies or is collaterally connected with something else; an accompaniment.
Quotes:
For a filmmaker so obsessed with these issues, it is a sad irony that his fear of things going wrong--and his concomitant mania for clockwork control--should have been a major reason for the failure of . . . his final film.
-Michiko Kakutani, "A Connoisseur of Cool Tries to Raise the Temperature", New York Times, July 18, 1999

--Quote of the Day: "All thoughts, all passions, all delights Whatever stirs this mortal frame All are but ministers of Love And feed His sacred flame."
-Samuel Taylor Coleridge

--French Word of the Day: nature (noun) la nature f;
(eg) Il aime tellement la nature qu'il envisage de devenir garde forestier.
(transl) He loves nature so much that he is thinking about becoming a park ranger.
let nature take its course: laissez faire la nature;
it is in the nature of things: il est dans l'ordre des choses.

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July 15, 2009

I Saw In Louisiana A Live-Oak Growing

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--Description: 19th C, Whitman W., Friendship, Hope, Nature

I saw in Louisiana a live-oak growing,
All alone stood it, and the moss hung down from the branches;
Without any companion it grew there, uttering joyous leaves of dark green,
And its look, rude, unbending, lusty, made me think of myself;
But I wonder'd how it could utter joyous leaves, standing alone there, without its friend, its lover near--for I knew I could not;
And broke off a twig with a certain number of leaves upon it, and twined around it a little moss,
And brought it away--and I have placed it in sight in my room;
It is not needed to remind me as of my own dear friends,
(For I believe lately I think of little else than them:)
Yet it remains to me a curious token--it makes me think of manly love;
For all that, and though the live-oak glistens there in Louisiana, solitary, in a wide flat space,
Uttering joyous leaves all its life, without a friend, a lover, near,
I know very well I could not.

Walt Whitman

--Did You Know: (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) Whitman was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. He was a part of the transition between Transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality.

--Word of the Day: louche\LOOSH\, adjective:
1. Of questionable taste or morality; disreputable or indecent; dubious; shady.
Quotes:
(eg) You've got to keep yourself free of any suggestion of louche behavior.
-Anthony West
(eg) A man in a bar, utterly average, though there is something louche about him, something sly.
-Andrew Holleran, In September, the Light Changes

--Quote of the Day: Although human subtlety makes a variety of inventions by different means to the same end, it will never devise an invention more beautiful, more simple, or more direct than does nature, because in her inventions nothing is lacking, and nothing is superfluous.
-Leonardo DaVinci

--French Word of the Day: headache (noun) mal a la tête;
to have a headache: avoir mal à la tête.
(eg) j'ai un mal à la tête.
(transl) I have a headache.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selectingE-mail or RSS Reader.Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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July 10, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 7/6-7/9/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week, it's time to re-discover all the beautiful things written. Here is a recap, and my  two favorite poems of the week.  What were YOURS? The two, terrific poems of the week for me in no particular order were:

--Lively Hope and Gracious Fear and The Rose Family --

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below, and click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
July 6, 2009

On His Blindness
--Description: 17th C, Milton J., Christianity, Perseverance

July 7, 2009

Conversation Galante
--Description: 20th C, Eliot T.S., Love, Nature, Nobility


July 8, 2009

Lively Hope and Gracious Fear
--Description: 20th C, Cowper W., Christianity, Hope


July 9, 2009

The Rose Family
--Description: 20th C, Frost R., Beauty, Love, Nature


--Word of the Day: verdant\VUR-dnt\, adjective:
1.Green with vegetation; covered with green growth.
2.Lacking experience or sophistication; naive.
Drab in winter, then suddenly sodden with alpine runoff, the region turns dazzlingly verdant in spring.
-Patricia Albers, Shadows, Fire, Snow

--Quote of the Day: Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.
-Theodore Roosevelt,

--Spanish Word of the Day: verano, noun:
summer
(eg) en verano
(transl) in summer, in the summer
verano, noun:
summer
(eg) las vacaciones veraniegas
(transl) summer vacation

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