June 30, 2009

The Darkling Thrush

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
Let this delightful poem inspire your day!
Photobucket


--Description: 20th C, Hardy T., Hope, Nature, Night

I leant upon a coppice gate
When Frost was spectre-gray,
And Winter’s dregs made desolate
The weakening eye of day.

The tangled bine-stems scored the sky
Like strings of broken lyres,
And all mankind that haunted nigh
Had sought their household fires.

The land’s sharp features seem’d to be
The Century’s corpse outleant,
His crypt the cloudy canopy,
The wind his death-lament.
The ancient pulse of germ and birth
Was shrunken hard and dry,
And every spirit upon earth
Seem’d fervourless as I.

At once a voice arose among
The bleak twigs overhead
In a full-hearted evensong
Of joy illimited;
An aged thrush, frail, gaunt, and small,
In blast-beruffled plume,
Had chosen thus to fling his soul
Upon the growing gloom.

So little cause for carrollings
Of such ecstatic sound,
Was written on terrestrial things
Afar or nigh around,
That I could think there trembled through
His happy good-night air,
Some blessed Hope whereof he knew
And I was unaware.

Thomas Hardy


--Did You Know:(2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) Hardy was an English author of the naturalist movement, although in several poems he displays elements of the previous romantic and enlightenment periods of literature, such as his fascination with the supernatural. He regarded himself primarily as a poet and composed novels mainly for financial gain. The bulk of his work, set mainly in the semi-fictional land of Wessex, delineates characters struggling against their passions and circumstances.

--Word of the Day: rodomontade \rod-uh-muhn-TADE; roh-duh-; -TAHD\, noun:
Vain boasting; empty bluster; pretentious, bragging speech; rant.
(eg)These are rejoinders born out of a need to deflate a balloon filled with what others view as pomposity or rodomontade.
-Corey Mesler, "Dispatch #1: Buying the Bookstore (The Early Days)", ForeWord, August 2000
(eg)The very absurdity of some of his later claims (inventors of jazz, originators of swing) . . . has made him an easy target in a way far beyond anything generated by that other (and in some ways quite similar) master of rodomontade, Jelly Roll Morton.
-Richard M. Sudhalter, Lost Chords

--Quote of the Day: Novelists do not write as birds sing, by the push of nature. It is part of the job that there should be much routine and some daily stuff on the level of carpentry.
-William Golding

Spanish Word of the Day: inoportuno, adjective:
untimely; worst; unsuitable
Note: Inoportuno often goes together with momento:
(eg) El micrófono falló en el momento más inoportuno.
The microphone failed at the worst or most awkward moment.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:


Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Posted by V. Mahfood
Pin It

June 27, 2009

Blackberry-Picking

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
Saturday's poem will serenade your soul.
Photobucket


--Description: 21st C, Heaney S., Nature, Seasons--


Late August, given heavy rain and sun
For a full week, the blackberries would ripen.
At first, just one, a glossy purple clot
Among others, red, green, hard as a knot.
You ate that first one and its flesh was sweet
Like thickened wine: summer's blood was in it
Leaving stains upon the tongue and lust for
Picking. Then red ones inked up and that hunger
Sent us out with milk cans, pea tins, jam-pots
Where briars scratched and wet grass bleached our boots.
Round hayfields, cornfields and potato-drills
We trekked and picked until the cans were full,
Until the tinkling bottom had been covered
With green ones, and on top big dark blobs burned
Like a plate of eyes. Our hands were peppered
With thorn pricks, our palms sticky as Bluebeard's.

We hoarded the fresh berries in the byre.
But when the bath was filled we found a fur,
A rat-grey fungus, glutting on our cache.
The juice was stinking too. Once off the bush
The fruit fermented, the sweet flesh would turn sour.
I always felt like crying. It wasn't fair
That all the lovely canfuls smelt of rot.
Each year I hoped they'd keep, knew they would not.

Seamus Heaney


--Did You Know:(born 13 April 1939) Heaney is an Irish poet, writer and lecturer who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. He currently lives in Dublin. He was born on April 13, 1939 into a family of nine children at the family farmhouse called Mossbawn, between Castledawson and Toomebridge in Northern Ireland. In 1953, his family moved to Bellaghy, a few miles away, which is now the family home. His father, Patrick Heaney, owned and worked a small farm of fifty acres in County Londonderry, but his real commitment was to cattle-dealing

--Word of the Day: effulgence \i-FUL-juhn(t)s\, noun:
The state of being bright and radiant; splendor; brilliance.
(eg) The purity of his private character gave effulgence to his public virtues.
-"Congressman Henry Lee's Eulogy for George Washington" , December 4, 1908
The setting sun as usual shed a melancholy effulgence on the ruddy towers of the Alhambra.
-Washington Irving, The Alhambra

--Quote of the Day: Every time a resolve or fine glow of feeling evaporates without bearing fruit, it is worse than a chance lost; it works to hinder future emotions from taking the normal path of discharge.
-William James

Spanish Word of the Day: confianza, noun:
Trust
(One of the meanings of confianza is confidence:)
(eg) Ese abogado tuyo no me inspira confianza.
That lawyer of yours doesn’t exactly fill me with confidence.

(Confianza also often means trust:)
(eg)Han puesto toda su confianza en él.
They’ve put all their trust in him.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:


Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Posted by V. Mahfood
Pin It

June 26, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 6/20-6/25/09

Bookmark and Share


Pin It

So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week, it's time to re-discover all the beautiful things written. Here is a recap, and my  two favorite poems of the week.  What were YOURS? The two, terrific poems of the week for me in no particular order were:

--There's a Baby in The House and Evening Song of the Thoughtful Child

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below, and click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
June 20, 2009
Two Lovers

--Description: 19th C, Eliot G., Aging, Life, Love--



June 21, 2009
Evening Primrose

--Description: 19th C, Clare J., Nature, Seasons--
 



June 22, 2009
Evening Song of the Thoughtful Child

--Description: 20th C, Mansfield K., Children, Dreams, Night--



June 23, 2009
Growing Old

--Description: 19th C, Arnold M., Aging, Humanity--



June 24, 2009
A Baby in The House

--Description: 20th C, Wilcox E., Children, Parenting



June 25, 2009
Rain

--Description: 20th C, Silverstein S., Nature, Childhood--



--Word of the Day: nonplus \non-PLUHS\, transitive verb:
To cause to be at a loss as to what to think, say, or do; to confound; to perplex; to bewilder.
(eg)But I could see in his little blinking eyes that my success had nonplussed him.
-Ferdinand Mount, Jem (and Sam)

--Quote of the Day: Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
-William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act V Scene V

--Spanish Word of the Day: copa, noun:
Glass; A glass with a stem, especially a wineglass.

(eg) Sólo tomé una copa de vino.
I only had one glass of wine.

(eg) Te invito a una copa.
Let me buy you a drink.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:

Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps


Posted by V. Mahfood





Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Pin It

June 25, 2009

Rain

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
Let this childhood poem brighten your busy day.



--Description: 20th C, Silverstein S., Nature, Childhood--


I opened my eyes
And looked up at the rain,
And it dripped in my head
And flowed into my brain,
And all that I hear as I lie in my bed
Is the slishity-slosh of the rain in my head.

I step very softly,
I walk very slow,
I can't do a handstand--
I might overflow,
So pardon the wild crazy thing I just said--
I'm just not the same since there's rain in my head.

Shel Silverstein


--Did You Know: (September 25, 1930–May 10, 1999) Silverstein was an American poet, singer-songwriter, musician, composer, cartoonist, screenwriter, and author of children's books. He sometimes styled himself as Uncle Shelby, especially for his early children's books. Silverstein confirmed he never studied the poetry of others therefore, developed his own quirky style: laid-back and conversational, occasionally employing profanity and slang.

--Word of the Day: daedal \DEE-duhl\, adjective:
1. Complex or ingenious in form or function; intricate.
2. Skillful; artistic; ingenious.
3. Rich; adorned with many things.
(eg) Most Web-site designers realize that large image maps and daedal layouts are to be avoided, and the leading World Wide Web designers have reacted to users' objections to highly graphical, slow sites by using uncluttered, easy-to-use layouts.
-"Fixing Web-site usability", InfoWorld, December 15, 1997

--Quote of the Day: It's designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring, when everything is new again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains comes, it stops, and leaves you to face the fall alone.
-A Bartlett Giamatti

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:


Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps


Posted by V. Mahfood


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Pin It

June 24, 2009

A Baby In The House

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
Let this loving poem brighten your day.
Photobucket


--Description: 20th C, Wilcox E., Children, Parenting



I knew that a baby was hid in that house,
Though I saw no cradle and heard no cry;
But the husband was tip-toeing 'round like a mouse,
And the good wife was humming a soft lullaby;
And there was a look on the face of the mother,
That I knew could mean only one thing, and no other.

The mother, I said to myself, for I knew
That the woman before me was certainly that;
And there lay in a corner a tiny cloth shoe,
And I saw on a stand such a wee little hat;
And the beard of the husband said, plain as could be,
'Two fat chubby hands have been tugging at me.'

And he took from his pocket a gay picture-book,
And a dog that could bark, if you pulled on a string;
And the wife laid them up with such a pleased look;
And I said to myself, 'There is no other thing
But a babe that could bring about all this, and so
That one thing is in hiding somewhere, I know.'

I stayed but a moment, and saw nothing more,
And heard not a sound, yet I know I was right;
What else could the shoe mean that lay on the floor,
The book and the toy, and the faces so bright;
And what made the husband as still as a mouse?
I am sure, very sure, there's a babe in that house.

Ella Wheeler Wilcox

--Did You Know: (November 5, 1850–October 30, 1919) A popular poet rather than a literary poet, in Wilcox's poems she expresses sentiments of cheer and optimism in plainly written, rhyming verse. Her world view is expressed in the title of her poem "Whatever Is—Is Best", suggesting an echo of Alexander Pope's "Whatever is, is right."

--Word of the Day: palindrome \PAL-in-drohm\ , noun:
A word, phrase, sentence, or verse that reads the same backward or forward.
(eg) Madam, I'm Adam. (Adam's first words to Eve?)

--Quote of the Day: The more people have studied different methods of bringing up children the more they have come to the conclusion that what good mothers and fathers instinctively feel like doing for their babies is the best after all.
-Benjamin Spock

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:

Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps

Posted by V. Mahfood


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Pin It

June 23, 2009

Evening Song of the Thoughtful Child

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
May this charming poem delight you today.


--Description: 20th C, Mansfield K., Children, Dreams, Night--

Shadow children, thin and small,
Now the day is left behind,
You are dancing on the wall,
On the curtains, on the blind.

On the ceiling, children, too,
Peeping round the nursery door,
Let me come and play with you,
As we always played before.

Let's pretend that we have wings
And can really truly fly
Over every sort of things
Up and up into the sky.

Where the sweet star children play--
It does seem a dreadful rule,
They must stay inside all day.
I suppose they go to school.

And to-night, dears, do you see,
They are having such a race
With their father moon--the tree
Almost hides his funny face.

Shadow children, once at night,
I was all tucked up in bed,
Father moon came--such a fright--
Through the window poked his head;

I could see his staring eyes,
O, my dears, I was afraid,
That was not a nice surprise,
And the dreadful noise I made!

Let us make a fairy ring,
Shadow children, hand in hand,
And our songs quite softly sing
That we learned in fairyland.

Shadow children, thin and small,
See, the day is far behind;
And I kiss you--on the wall--
On the curtains--on the blind.

Katherine Mansfield

--Did You Know: (14 October 1888 – 9 January 1923) Mansfield was a prominent modernist writer of short fiction from New Zealand who wrote under the pen name of Katherine Mansfield. She was born Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp, in 1888, into a socially prominent family in Wellington, New Zealand. She was the daughter of a banker and born to a middle-class colonial family.

--Word of the Day: peradventure \puhr-uhd-VEN-chuhr; pehr-\,
adverb:
1. [Archaic] Possibly; perhaps.
noun:
1. Chance, uncertainty, or doubt.
(eg) It establishes beyond any peradventure of doubt that they were all wet and all wrong in their reports about the weapons of mass destruction, the chemical weapons, the biological weapons and the coming nuclear weapons as well.
-Daniel Schorr, "interview Weekend Edition - Saturday, with Susan Stamberg", National Public Radio

--Quote of the Day: The heights by great men reached and kept
Were not obtained by sudden flight,
But they, while their companions slept,
Were toiling upward in the night
-Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


Subscribe to awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:


Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps


Posted by V. Mahfood

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Pin It

June 22, 2009

Growing Old

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
May this poem fill your day with inspiring thought.
Photobucket


--Description: 19th C, Arnold M., Aging, Humanity--


What is it to grow old?
Is it to lose the glory of the form,
The lustre of the eye?
Is it for beauty to forego her wreath?
Yes, but not for this alone.

Is it to feel our strength
Not our bloom only, but our strength decay?
Is it to feel each limb
Grow stiffer, every function less exact,
Each nerve more weakly strung?

Yes, this, and more! but not,
Ah, 'tis not what in youth we dreamed 'twould be!
'Tis not to have our life
Mellowed and softened as with sunset-glow,
A golden day's decline!

'Tis not to see the world
As from a height, with rapt prophetic eyes,
And heart profoundly stirred;
And weep, and feel the fulness of the past,
The years that are no more!

It is to spend long days
And not once feel that we were ever young.
It is to add, immured
In the hot prison of the present, month
To month with weary pain.

It is to suffer this,
And feel but half, and feebly, what we feel:
Deep in our hidden heart
Festers the dull remembrance of a change,
But no emotion none.

It is last stage of all
When we are frozen up within, and quite
The phantom of ourselves,
To hear the world applaud the hollow ghost
Which blamed the living man.

Matthew Arnold


--Did You Know: (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) Arnold was an English poet, and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools. Matthew Arnold has been characterized as a sage writer, a type of writer who chastises and instructs the reader on contemporary social issues.

--Word of the Day: tutelary \TOO-tuh-lair-ee; TYOO-\, adjective:
Having the guardianship or charge of protecting a person or a thing; guardian; protecting; as, "tutelary goddesses."
(eg) For the first time in history, a republic welcomed, perhaps even required, the release of the individual from tutelary powers, and in particular from religious authority.
-Diana Schaub, "On the Character of Generation X"

--Quote of the Day: Most men experience getting older with regret, apprehension. But most women experience it even more painfully: with shame. Aging is a man's destiny, something that must happen because he is a human being.
-Susan Sontag

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:

Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Posted by V. Mahfood
Pin It

June 20, 2009

Two Lovers

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
Let this charming poem delight your weekend.
Happy Father's Day to these special men in the world.
Photobucket

--Description: 19th C, Eliot G., Aging, Life, Love--



Two lovers by a moss-grown spring:
They leaned soft cheeks together there,
Mingled the dark and sunny hair,
And heard the wooing thrushes sing.
O budding time!
O love's blest prime!

Two wedded from the portal stept:
The bells made happy carolings,
The air was soft as fanning wings,
White petals on the pathway slept.
O pure-eyed bride!
O tender pride!

Two faces o'er a cradle bent:
Two hands above the head were locked:
These pressed each other while they rocked,
Those watched a life that love had sent.
O solemn hour!
O hidden power!

Two parents by the evening fire:
The red light fell about their knees
On heads that rose by slow degrees
Like buds upon the lily spire.
O patient life!
O tender strife!

The two still sat together there,
The red light shone about their knees;
But all the heads by slow degrees
Had gone and left that lonely pair.
O voyage fast!
O vanished past!

The red light shone upon the floor
And made the space between them wide;
They drew their chairs up side by side,
Their pale cheeks joined, and said, "Once more!"
O memories!
O past that is!

George Eliot

--Did You Know: (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880) She was one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. Her novels, largely set in provincial England, are well known for their realism and psychological insight. She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure that her works were taken seriously.

--Word of the Day: oneiric \oh-NY-rik\, adjective:
Of, pertaining to, or suggestive of dreams; dreamy.
(eg) On this score, the novel might easily drift off into an oneiric never-never land, but Mr. Welch doesn't let this happen.
-Peter Wild

--Quote of the Day: A cat is a regency gentleman--elegant of pose, exquisite of manner, with spotless linen and an enthusiasm for bare knuckle fights, rampaging love affairs, duels by moonlight and the singing of glees. He expects immaculate service from his domestic staff, and possesses a range of invective that would make a navy blanch.
-Pam Brown


Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to the awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:


Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Posted by V. Mahfood
Pin It

June 19, 2009

Terrific Two of the Week: 6/14-6/19/09

Bookmark and Share


Pin It

So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week, it's time to re-discover all the beautiful things written. Here is a recap, and my  two favorite poems of the week.  What were YOURS? Feel free to comment and let me know.

The two, terrific poems of the week for me in no particular order were:

--Forgotten Language and The Dream-Town Show

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below, and click on the titles to access the poems:
 ----------------------------------
June 13, 2009


Forgotten Language
--Description: 20th C, Silverstein S., Nature, Childhood--


June 14, 2009
Chanson
--Description: 20th C, Wilde O., Love, Death--



June 15, 2009
The Dream-Town Show
--Description: 20th C, Wilcox E.W., Dreams,Fantasy--


June 16, 2009
There Be None of Beauty's Daughters
--Description: 20th C, Byron G.G., Beauty, Love--


June 17, 2009
Break of Day
--Description: 20th C, Donne, J., Love--


June 18, 2009
O Bird of Light

--Description: 20th C, Chinmoy S., Encouragement, Hope--



Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:


Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps

Posted by V. Mahfood
Pin It

June 18, 2009

O Bird of Light

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
May this charming
 poem light your world today.
Photobucket


--Description: 20th C, Chinmoy S., Encouragement, Hope--


One thought, one tune, one resonance-
Who calls me ever and anon?
I know not where I am.
I know not whither I shall go.
In dark amnesia,
Myself I buy, myself I sell.
All I break, again all I build.
All I hope to be mine, mine alone.
Alas, my heart is eclipsed
By dark and wild destruction night.

O Bird of Light, O Bird of Light,
With your glowing and flowing flames
Do enter into my heart once again.
You are calling me to climb up
And fly into the blue.
But how can I?
My heart is in prison,
In the strangled breath of a tiny room.
O Bird of Light, O Bird of Light,
O Bird of Light Supreme.
In me, I pray, keep not an iota of gloom.

Sri Chinmoy


--Did You Know: (August 27, 1931 – October 11, 2007) He was an Indian spiritual teacher and philosopher. His teachings emphasize love for God, daily meditation on the heart, service to the world, and religious tolerance (a view that "all faiths" are essentially divine").

--Word of the Day: prescience \PREE-shuns; PREE-shee-uns; PRESH-uns; PRESH-ee-uns; PREE-see-uns; PRES-ee-uns\, noun:
Knowledge of events before they take place; foresight.
--prescient,adjective
(eg) But you could not fault his prescience in 1980 when he [Arthur Seldon] wrote: "China will go capitalist. Soviet Russia will not survive the century. Labour as we know it will never rule again. Socialism is an irrelevance."
-Electronic Telegraph, March 28, 1997

--Quote of the Day: "He hoped and prayed that there wasn't an afterlife. Then he realized there was a contradiction involved here and merely hoped that there wasn't an afterlife."
-Douglas Adams

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to the awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:


Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Posted by V. Mahfood
Pin It

June 17, 2009

Break of Day

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
Let this special poem color your world.


--Description: 17th C, Donne, J., Love--


Tis true, 'tis day; what though it be?
O wilt thou therefore rise from me?
Why should we rise, because 'tis light?
Did we lie down, because 'twas night?
Love, which in spite of darkness brought us hither,
Should in despite of light keep us together.

Light hath no tongue, but is all eye;
If it could speak as well as spy,
This were the worst that it could say,
That being well, I fain would stay,
And that I loved my heart and honor so,
That I would not from him, that had them, go.

Must business thee from hence remove?
O, that's the worst disease of love.
The poor, the foul, the false, love can
Admit, but not the busied man.
He which hath business, and makes love, doth do
Such wrong, as when a married man doth woo.


John Donne

--Did You Know: 1572 – 31 March 1631) He was an English Jacobean poet, preacher and a major representative of the metaphysical poets of the period. His works are notable for their realistic and sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, especially as compared to those of his contemporaries.

--Word of the Day: cosset \KOSS-it\, transitive verb:
1. To treat as a pet; to treat with excessive indulgence; to pamper.
2. A pet, especially a pet lamb.
(eg) Sumner's parents, for instance, were routinely attended by butlers, maids, coachmen and grooms while little Sumner and his sister, Emily, were pampered and cosseted from infancy by nurserymaids and governesses.
-Benjamin Welles, Sumner Welles: FDR's Global Strategist

--Quote of the Day: If you're bored with life -- you don't get up every morning with a burning desire to do things -- you don't have enough goals.
-Lou Holtz

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Subscribe to awesome Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps:


Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps

↑ Grab this Headline Animator

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Posted by V. Mahfood
Pin It
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Subscribe RSS

coffee128

*Your AD or LINK

~ Place your site link or ad here!






Labels

 

Copyright ©2008-2012 Coffee Table Poetry For Tea Drinkers by V. Mahfood

Copyright © 2008-2010 Green Scrapbook Diary Designed by SimplyWP | Made free by Scrapbooking Software | Bloggerized by Ipiet Notez