May 31, 2009

Sonnet 21: Say Over Again, And Yet Once Over Again

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Let Sunday's Sonnet serenade you today.



--Description: 19th C, Browning E., Love, Sonnet--
 


 

Say over again, and yet once over again,
That thou dost love me. Though the word repeated
Should seem 'a cuckoo-song,' as thou dost treat it,
Remember, never to the hill or plain,
Valley and wood, without her cuckoo-strain
Comes the fresh Spring in all her green completed.
Beloved, I, amid the darkness greeted
By a doubtful spirit-voice, in that doubt's pain
Cry, 'Speak once more—thou lovest! 'Who can fear
Too many stars, though each in heaven shall roll,
Too many flowers, though each shall crown the year?
Say thou dost love me, love me, love me—toll
The silver iterance!—only minding, Dear,
To love me also in silence with thy soul.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning


--Did You Know: Browning's 1844 Poems made her one of the most popular writers in the land at the time and inspired Robert Browning to write to her, telling her how much he loved her poems. Kenyon arranged for Browning to meet Elizabeth in May 1845, and so began one of the most famous courtships in literature.
Elizabeth had produced a large amount of works and had been writing long before Robert Browning had even published a word. However, he had a great influence on her writing, as did she on his.

--Word of the Day: irrefragable \ih-REF-ruh-guh-buhl\, adjective:
Meaning: Impossible to refute; incontestable; undeniable; as, an irrefragable argument; irrefragable evidence.
Example: I had the most irrefragable evidence of the absolute truth and soundness of the principle upon which my invention was based.
(Sir Henry Bessemer, Autobiography)

--Quote of the Day: It is my misfortune - and probably my delight - to use things as my passions tell me. What a miserable fate for a painter who adores blondes to have to stop himself putting them into a picture because they don't go with the basket of fruit! ... I put all the things I like into my pictures. The things - so much the worse for them. They just have to put up with it.
(Pablo Picasso)

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May 29, 2009

Terrific Two Poems of the Week: 5/23 - 5/28/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week, it's time to take a step back and re-discover all the beautiful things written. Here is a recap and my own, personal two favorite poems of the week.  What were yours? Feel free to comment and let me know.

--The two terrific poems of the week, in no particular order, were for me:

The Light of Stars, More Strong Than Time

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. Simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail! Please continue reading the Recap below, and click on the titles for poems:

 ----------------------------------
May 23, 2009


Poems on Perseverance
--Description: 21st C, Chinmoy S., Encouragement, Perseverance--


May 24, 2009
--Description: 19th C, Wordsworth H., Hope, Nature, Night--
 


May 25, 2009

Hope
--Description: 21st C., Chinmoy S., Encouragement, Hope--


May 26, 2009


More Strong Than Time
--Description: 19thC, Hugo V., Adoration, Love--



May 27, 2009
--Description: 20th C, Neruda P., Love, Sadness, Separation--
May 28, 2009

--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H., Nature--


-Word of the Day: depredation \dep-ruh-DAY-shun\ , noun:
Meaning: 1. An act of plundering or despoiling; a raid.
2. [Plural] Destructive operations; ravages.
Example: It is appalling, the depredations of pirates and privateers on the high seas.
(Jacqueline Jones, American Work)

--Quote of the Day: Kindness is the only service that will stand the storm of life and not wash out. It will wear well and be remembered long after the prism of politeness or the complexion of courtesy has faded away. When I am gone, I hope it can be said of me that I plucked a thistle and planted a flower wherever I thought a flower would grow.
(Anon)

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

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May 28, 2009

The Secret of the Sea

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--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H., Nature--


Ah! what pleasant visions haunt me
As I gaze upon the sea!
All the old romantic legends,
All my dreams, come back to me.

Sails of silk and ropes of sandal,
Such as gleam in ancient lore;
And the singing of the sailors,
And the answer from the shore!

Most of all, the Spanish ballad
Haunts me oft, and tarries long,
Of the noble Count Arnaldos
And the sailor's mystic song.

Like the long waves on a sea-beach,
Where the sand as silver shines,
With a soft, monotonous cadence,
Flow its unrhymed lyric lines:--

Telling how the Count Arnaldos,
With his hawk upon his hand,
Saw a fair and stately galley,
Steering onward to the land;--

How he heard the ancient helmsman
Chant a song so wild and clear,
That the sailing sea-bird slowly
Poised upon the mast to hear,

Till his soul was full of longing,
And he cried, with impulse strong,--
"Helmsman! for the love of heaven,
Teach me, too, that wondrous song!"

"Wouldst thou,"--so the helmsman answered,
"Learn the secret of the sea?
Only those who brave its dangers
Comprehend its mystery!"

In each sail that skims the horizon,
In each landward-blowing breeze,
I behold that stately galley,
Hear those mournful melodies;

Till my soul is full of longing
For the secret of the sea,
And the heart of the great ocean
Sends a thrilling pulse through me.


Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


--Did You Know: After graduating in 1825, he was offered a job as professor of modern languages at his alma mater. The story, possibly apocryphal, is that an influential trustee, Benjamin Orr, had been so impressed by Longfellow's translation of Horace that he was hired under the condition that he travel to Europe to study French, Spanish, and Italian.

--Word of the Day: sagacious \suh-GAY-shus\, adjective:
Meaning: Having or showing keen discernment, sound judgment, and farsightedness.
Example: Edward's uncle, a sagacious scholar equally at home with Celtic myth and Eastern wisdom, declines his nephew's request to tell the story of Hamlet (it would come too close to home).
(John Gross, New York Times, December 3, 1984)

--Quote of the Day: "I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in finding a smoother pebble or prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me."

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May 27, 2009

A Song of Despair

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--Description: 20th C, Neruda P., Love, Sadness, Separation--
 
 

The memory of you emerges from the night around me.
The river mingles its stubborn lament with the sea.

Deserted like the dwarves at dawn.
It is the hour of departure, oh deserted one!

Cold flower heads are raining over my heart.
Oh pit of debris, fierce cave of the shipwrecked.

In you the wars and the flights accumulated.
From you the wings of the song birds rose.

You swallowed everything, like distance.
Like the sea, like time. In you everything sank!

It was the happy hour of assault and the kiss.
The hour of the spell that blazed like a lighthouse.

Pilot's dread, fury of blind driver,
turbulent drunkenness of love, in you everything sank!

In the childhood of mist my soul, winged and wounded.
Lost discoverer, in you everything sank!

You girdled sorrow, you clung to desire,
sadness stunned you, in you everything sank!

I made the wall of shadow draw back,
beyond desire and act, I walked on.

Oh flesh, my own flesh, woman whom I loved and lost,
I summon you in the moist hour, I raise my song to you.

Like a jar you housed infinite tenderness.
and the infinite oblivion shattered you like a jar.

There was the black solitude of the islands,
and there, woman of love, your arms took me in.

There was thirst and hunger, and you were the fruit.
There were grief and ruins, and you were the miracle.

Ah woman, I do not know how you could contain me
in the earth of your soul, in the cross of your arms!

How terrible and brief my desire was to you!
How difficult and drunken, how tensed and avid.

Cemetery of kisses, there is still fire in your tombs,
still the fruited boughs burn, pecked at by birds.

Oh the bitten mouth, oh the kissed limbs,
oh the hungering teeth, oh the entwined bodies.
Oh the mad coupling of hope and force
in which we merged and despaired.

And the tenderness, light as water and as flour.
And the word scarcely begun on the lips.

This was my destiny and in it was my voyage of my longing,
and in it my longing fell, in you everything sank!

Oh pit of debris, everything fell into you,
what sorrow did you not express, in what sorrow are you not drowned!

From billow to billow you still called and sang.
Standing like a sailor in the prow of a vessel.

You still flowered in songs, you still brike the currents.
Oh pit of debris, open and bitter well.

Pale blind diver, luckless slinger,
lost discoverer, in you everything sank!

It is the hour of departure, the hard cold hour
which the night fastens to all the timetables.

The rustling belt of the sea girdles the shore.
Cold stars heave up, black birds migrate.

Deserted like the wharves at dawn.
Only tremulous shadow twists in my hands.

Oh farther than everything. Oh farther than everything.

It is the hour of departure. Oh abandoned one!

Pablo Neruda


(Especially liked by Poetsdream7 on Twitter)

--Did You Know: Neruda owned three houses in Chile; today they are all open to the public as museums: La Chascona in Santiago, La Sebastiana in Valparaíso, and Casa de Isla Negra in Isla Negra, where he and Matilde Urrutia are buried.

--Word of the Day: dissimulate (di-SIM-yuh-layt) verb:
Meaning: To disguise one's intentions, thoughts, motives, etc. by pretense.
Example: "Charles Clarke added: 'We need to talk straight to people, engaging the concerns and questions that they have, rather than appearing to evade and dissimulate.'"
(Andrew Grice; Clarke: Brown Succession Is Not A Done Deal; The Independent (London, UK); Mar 29, 2007.)

--Quote of the Day: The ideal of happiness has always taken material form in the house, whether cottage or castle; it stands for permanence and separation from the world.
(Simone de Beauvoir)

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.









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May 26, 2009

More Strong Than Time

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inspire you today.



--Description: 19thC, Hugo V., Adoration, Love--


Since I have set my lips to your full cup, my sweet,
Since I my pallid face between your hands have laid,
Since I have known your soul, and all the bloom of it,
And all the perfume rare, now buried in the shade;

Since it was given to me to hear one happy while,
The words wherein your heart spoke all its mysteries,
Since I have seen you weep, and since I have seen you smile,
Your lips upon my lips, and your eyes upon my eyes;

Since I have known above my forehead glance and gleam,
A ray, a single ray, of your star, veiled always,
Since I have felt the fall, upon my lifetime's stream,
Of one rose petal plucked from the roses of your days;

I now am bold to say to the swift changing hours,
Pass, pass upon your way, for I grow never old,
Fleet to the dark abysm with all your fading flowers,
One rose that none may pluck, within my heart I hold.

Your flying wings may smite, but they can never spill
The cup fulfilled of love, from which my lips are wet;
My heart has far more fire than you have frost to chill,
My soul more love than you can make my soul forget.


Victor Hugo


--Did You Know: Hugo is sometimes identified as the greatest French poet. Outside France, his best-known works are the novels Les Misérables and Notre-Dame de Paris (known in English also as The Hunchback of Notre Dame).

--Word of the Day: immure \ih-MYUR\, verb:
Meaning: 1. To enclose within walls, or as if within walls; hence, to shut up; to imprison; to incarcerate.
2. To build into a wall.
3. To entomb in a wall.
Example: Not surprisingly, Sally shuddered at the thought of being immured in the black cave, to die slowly and hopelessly, far below the sunny hillside.
(Peter Pierce, "The Fiction of Gabrielle Lord", Australian Literary Studies, October 1999)

--Quote of the Day: Compassion is sometimes the fatal capacity for feeling what it is like to live inside somebody else's skin. It is the knowledge that there can never really be any peace and joy for me until there is peace and joy finally for you too.
(Frederick Buechner)

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May 25, 2009

Hope

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--Description: 21st C., Chinmoy S., Encouragement, Hope--


Hope
Is kind.
Therefore
I mix with hope.
Hope
Is swift.
Therefore
I run with hope,
Hope
Is brave.
Therefore
I collect boundless strength
From hope.
Hope
Is sincere.
Therefore
I invite hope
To accompany me
To the Golden Shore.

Sri Chinmoy


--Did You Know: ChinMoy was an Indian spiritual teacher and philosopher who emigrated to the U.S. in 1964. An author, composer, artist and athlete, he was perhaps best known for holding public events on the theme of inner peace and world harmony.

--Word of the Day: deliquesce \del-ih-KWES\ , intransitive verb:
Meaning: 1. To melt away or to disappear as if by melting.
2. (Chemistry) To dissolve gradually and become liquid by attracting and absorbing moisture from the air, as certain salts, acids, and alkalies.
3. To become fluid or soft with age, as certain fungi.
4. To form many small divisions or branches -- used especially of the veins of a leaf.
Example: Now it's high summer, the very high point of the high season, and I've just struggled back from Santa Eulalia with the weekly shop, most of which has already deliquesced into an evil-smelling puddle in the back of the car.
(Paul Richardson, "A postcard from Paul Richardson", Independent, August 19, 1996)

--Quote of the Day: Hope calculates its scenes for a long and durable life; presses forward to imaginary points of bliss; and grasps at impossibilities; and consequently very often ensnares men into beggary, ruin and dishonor.
(Joseph Addison)

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May 24, 2009

The Light of Stars

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--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H. W., Hope, Nature, Night--
 
 

The night is come, but not too soon;
And sinking silently,
All silently, the little moon
Drops down behind the sky.

There is no light in earth or heaven
But the cold light of stars;
And the first watch of night is given
To the red planet Mars.

Is it the tender star of love?
The star of love and dreams?
O no! from that blue tent above,
A hero's armor gleams.

And earnest thoughts within me rise,
When I behold afar,
Suspended in the evening skies,
The shield of that red star.

O star of strength! I see thee stand
And smile upon my pain;
Thou beckonest with thy mailed hand,
And I am strong again.

Within my breast there is no light
But the cold light of stars;
I give the first watch of the night
To the red planet Mars.

The star of the unconquered will,
He rises in my breast,
Serene, and resolute, and still,
And calm, and self-possessed.

And thou, too, whosoe'er thou art,
That readest this brief psalm,
As one by one thy hopes depart,
Be resolute and calm.

O fear not in a world like this,
And thou shalt know erelong,
Know how sublime a thing it is
To suffer and be strong.


Henry Wordsworth Longfellow

--Did You Know: Longfellow predominantly wrote lyric poems which are known for their musicality and which often presented stories of mythology and legend. He became the most popular American poet of his day and also had success overseas.

--Word of the Day: beneficence \buh-NEFF-i-suhns\ , noun:
Meaning: 1. The practice of doing good; active goodness, kindness, or charity.
Example: 2. A charitable gift or act.
Lord Jeffrey told Dickens that it [A Christmas Carol] had "prompted more positive acts of beneficence than can be traced to all the pulpits and confessionals in Christendom since Christmas 1842."
(Roger Highfield, The Physics of Christmas)

--Quote of the Day: Whether sixty or sixteen, there is in every human being's heart the lure of wonder, the unfailing child-like appetite of what's next, and the joy of the game of living. In the center of your heart and my heart there is a wireless station; so long as it receives messages of beauty, hope, cheer, courage and power from men and from the infinite, so long are you are young.
(Samuel Ullman)

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May 23, 2009

Poems on Perseverance

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--Description: 21st C, Chinmoy S., Encouragement, Perseverance--


Perseverance
Never accepts
Defeat.

Patience and perseverance
Are of supreme importance
On any spiritual path.

The mind takes perseverance
As something
Extremely bitter.

The heart takes perseverance
As something most essential
To bring down
God's Compassion-Satisfaction
Into the heart-pocket of the seeker.

Perseverance, perseverance,
Perseverance!
You can turn me into
A genius.

What you need is patience,
What you need is perseverance
To satisfy God
In every human being.

The mind's obedience
And
The heart's perseverance
Together can accomplish
Everything they want to.

No patience, no perseverance,
The outer success and the inner progress
Will remain a far cry.
Perseverance
Eventually shall arrive
At the Golden Shore.

His heart of patience
And his life of perseverance
Have at long last granted him
Heaven's ever-increasing ecstasy-sky.

Sri Chinmoy


--Did You Know: He was an Indian spiritual teacher and philosopher who emigrated to the U.S. in 1964.[2]An author, composer, artist and athlete, he was perhaps best known for holding public events on the theme of inner peace and world harmony (such as concerts, meditations, and races).

--Word of the Day: refractory \rih-FRAK-tuh-ree\ , adjective:
Meaning: 1. Stubbornly disobedient; unmanageable.
2. Resisting ordinary treatment or cure.
3. Difficult to melt or work; capable of enduring high temperature.
Example: It's a head shot of Lucien Bouchard peering out of the dark, openmouthed, teeth showing, eyes glittering and appearing not to have shaved in a week. In another age, the shot might have been held up to a refractory kid with the warning, "The boogeyman will get you if you don't watch out."
(George Bain, "Whose Reality?", Time, October 13, 1997)

--Quote of the Day: Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained.
(Marie Curie)

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.



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May 22, 2009

Terrific Two Poems of the Week: 5/16 - 5/21/09

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So many intriguing poems by various poets have been covered this week, it's time to take a step back and re-discover all the beautiful things written. Here is a recap and my own, personal two favorite poems of the week.  What were yours? Feel free to comment and let me know.

--The two terrific poems of the week, in no particular order, were for me:
Genesis of Butterflies and The Passionate Shepherd to His Love

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated daily. To get your regular poetic inspiration, simply subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. You will treasure getting daily poetry in your mail!

 ---------------------------
May 16, 2009
--Description: 19th C, Blake W., Aging, Angels--


May 17, 2009

--Description: 17th C, Shakespeare W., Love, Adoration--




May 18, 2009


--Description: 16th C., Marlowe C., Love--




May 19, 2009
--Description: 19th C, Shelley P., Love, Sleep--




May 20, 2009

--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H., Nature, Night--
 



May 21, 2009
--Description: 19th C, Hugo V., Nature, Seasons--




--Word of the Day: bonhomie \bah-nuh-MEE\ , noun:
Meaning: Good nature; pleasant and easy manner.
Example: That bonhomie which won the hearts of all who knew him.
(Washington Irving, Oliver Goldsmith)

--Quote of the Day: "Write the bad things that are done to you in sand, but write the good things that happen to you on a piece of marble."
(Arabic Proverb)

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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May 20, 2009

Hymn To The Night

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--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H., Nature, Night--
 
 

I heard the trailing garments of the Night
Sweep through her marble halls!
I saw her sable skirts all fringed with light
From the celestial walls!
I felt her presence, by its spell of might,
Stoop o'er me from above;
The calm, majestic presence of the Night,
As of the one I love.

I heard the sounds of sorrow and delight,
The manifold, soft chimes,
That fill the haunted chambers of the Night
Like some old poet's rhymes.

From the cool cisterns of the midnight air
My spirit drank repose;
The fountain of perpetual peace flows there,--
From those deep cisterns flows.

O holy Night! from thee I learn to bear
What man has borne before!
Thou layest thy finger on the lips of Care,
And they complain no more.

Peace! Peace! Orestes-like I breathe this prayer!
Descend with broad-winged flight,
The welcome, the thrice-prayed for, the most fair,
The best-beloved Night!


Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

--Did You Know: He pursued his literary goals by submitting poetry and prose to various newspapers and magazines, partly due to encouragement from a professor.

--Word of the Day: bacchanalia \bak-uh-NAIL-yuh\ , noun:
Meaning: 1. (plural, capitalized) The ancient Roman festival in honor of Bacchus, celebrated with dancing, song, and revelry.
2. A riotous, boisterous, or drunken festivity; a revel.
Example: Alpha Epsilon brothers began their bacchanalia with an off-campus keg party featuring "funneling," in which beer is shot through a rubber hose into the drinker's mouth.
(Adam Cohen, "Battle of the Binge", Time, September 8, 1997)

--Quote of the Day: Night, the beloved. Night, when words fade and things come alive. When the destructive analysis of day is done, and all that is truly important becomes whole and sound again. When man reassembles his fragmentary self and grows with the calm of a tree.
(Antoine De Saint-Exupery)

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.


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