December 14, 2009

Sonnet: On The Sonnet

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--Description: 19th C, Keats J., Sonnet--


If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd,
And, like Andromeda, the Sonnet sweet
Fetter'd, in spite of pained loveliness,
Let us find, if we must be constrain'd,
Sandals more interwoven and complete
To fit the naked foot of Poesy:
Let us inspect the Lyre, and weigh the stress
Of every chord, and see what may be gain'd
By ear industrious, and attention meet;
Misers of sound and syllable, no less
Than Midas of his coinage, let us be
Jealous of dead leaves in the bay wreath crown;
So, if we may not let the Muse be free,
She will be bound with garlands of her own.

John Keats

--Did You Know: (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) Keats was an English poet, who became one of the key figures of the Romantic movement. Along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Keats was part of the Second Generation Romantic Poets. During his very short life his work received constant critical attacks from periodicals of the day, but his posthumous influence on poets such as Alfred Tennyson and Wilfred Owen would be immense. Keats's poetry was characterised by elaborate word choice and sensual imagery, notably in a series of odes that were his masterpieces, and which remain among the most popular poems in English literature. Keats's letters, which expound on his aesthetic theory of "negative capability", are among the most celebrated by any writer. John Keats was born in 1795 at 85 Moorgate in London, England, where his father, Thomas Keats, was a hostler. The pub is now called "Keats at the Globe", only a few yards from Moorgate station. The beginnings of his troubles occurred in 1804, when his father died of a fractured skull after falling from his horse. A year later, in 1805, Keats's grandfather died. His mother, Frances Jennings Keats, remarried soon afterwards, but quickly left the new husband and moved herself and her four children (a son had died in infancy) to live with Keats's grandmother, Alice Jennings. There, Keats attended a school that first instilled a love of literature in him. Read more at: John Keats

--Word of the Day: recalcitrant \rih-KAL-sih-truhnt\, adjective:
Stubbornly resistant to and defiant of authority or restraint.
Example:
If they lingered too long, Clarice hurried them along in the same annoyed way she rushed recalcitrant goats through the gate.
-Kaye Gibbons, On the Occasion of My Last Afternoon

--Quote of the Day: Let us not pray to be sheltered from dangers but to be fearless when facing them.
-Rabindranath Tagore

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What do the Chinese call kwai-tsze, or "quick little fellows"?

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS TRIVIA:
What regional accent did Americans deem sexiest, most liked and most recognizable?
Answer: Southern

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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