November 11, 2009

An Irish Airman Foresees His Death

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Let this patriotic poem please your day!
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--Description: 20th C, Yeats, W.B., Death, Life, Patriotism--


I know that I shall meet my fate
Somewhere among the clouds above;
Those that I fight I do not hate,
Those that I guard I do not love;
My county is Kiltartan Cross,
My countrymen Kiltartan's poor,
No likely end could bring them loss
Or leave them happier than before.
Nor law, nor duty bade me fight,
Nor public men, nor cheering crowds,
A lonely impulse of delight
Drove to this tumult in the clouds;
I balanced all, brought all to mind,
The years to come seemed waste of breath,
A waste of breath the years behind
In balance with this life, this death.

William Butler Yeats

--Did You Know: (3 June 1865–28 January 1939) Yeats was an Irish poet and dramatist and one of the foremost figures of 20th century literature. A pillar of both the Irish and British literary establishments, in his later years Yeats served as an Irish Senator for two terms. He was a driving force behind the Irish Literary Revival, and along with Lady Gregory and Edward Martyn founded the Abbey Theatre, and served as its chief during its early years. In 1923, he was awarded a Nobel Prize in Literature for what the Nobel Committee described as "inspired poetry, which in a highly artistic form gives expression to the spirit of a whole nation;" and he was the first Irishman so honored.[1] Yeats is generally considered one of the few writers whose greatest works were completed after being awarded the Nobel Prize; such works include The Tower (1928) and The Winding Stair and Other Poems (1929). Yeats was born and educated in Dublin, but spent his childhood in County Sligo. He studied poetry in his youth, and from an early age was fascinated by both Irish legends and the occult.

--Word of the Day: daymare /(DAY-mayr), noun:
A terrifying experience, similar to a nightmare, felt while awake.
Example:
"Reports like these give me a deep and sickening feeling, somewhere between a daymare and deja vu."
-Margaret McCartney; A Swiss Cheese Method to Eliminate Fatal Errors; Financial Times (London, UK); Feb 18, 2006.

--Quote of the Day: I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.
-Nathan Hale

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What single name is more commonly applied to Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Great?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What ethnic group was largely responsible for building most of the early railways in the U.S. West?
Answer: The Chinese.

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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