November 19, 2009

A Drop Fell on the Apple Tree

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--Description: 19th C, Dickinson E., Nature, Seasons--

A drop fell on the apple tree
Another on the roof;
A half a dozen kissed the eaves,
And made the gables laugh.

A few went out to help the brook,
That went to help the sea.
Myself conjectured, Were they pearls,
What necklaces could be!

The dust replaced in hoisted roads
The birds jocoser sung;
The sunshine threw his hat away,
The orchards spangles hung.

The breezes brought dejected
And bathed them in the glee;
The East put out a single flag,
And signed the fete away.

Emily Dickinson

--Did You Know: (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) Dickinson was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After she studied at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence. Although Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime.[2] The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation.[3] Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring topics in letters to her friends. Read more at: Emily Dickinson

--Word of the Day: truculent \TRUCK-yuh-luhnt\, adjective:
1. Fierce; savage; ferocious; barbarous.
2. Cruel; destructive; ruthless.
Example:
I ask whether impeachment will become still another arrow in the quiver of the warrior class of ever more truculent partisan politicians in Washington.

--Quote of the Day: Your example is far more influential and inspiring than any words of instruction, or threats, or even words of encouragement.
-Jonathan Lockwood Huie


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--TRIVIA FUN: What religion has the most adherents: Buddhism, Christianity or Islam?

ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S TRIVIA:
What was 11th-century Spanish military leader Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar better know as?
Answer: El Cid

...SEE TOMORROW'S POST for today's Answer...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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