September 21, 2009

Chaucer

Bookmark and Share


Pin It
Let this delightful poem inspire your day!
Photobucket


--Description: 19th C, Longfellow H.W., Humanity, Sonnet, Tribute--



An old man in a lodge
within a park;
The chamber walls depicted all around
With portraitures of huntsman, hawk, and hound,
And the hurt deer. He listeneth to the lark,
Whose song comes with the sunshine through the dark
Of painted glass in leaden lattice bound;
He listeneth and he laugheth at the sound,
Then writeth in a book like any clerk.
He is the poet of the dawn, who wrote
The Canterbury Tales, and his old age
Made beautiful with song; and as I read
I hear the crowing cock, I hear the note
Of lark and linnet, and from every page
Rise odors of ploughed field or flowery mead.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

--Did You Know: (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) Longfellow was an American educator and poet whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and "Evangeline". He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri's The Divine Comedy and was one of the five members of the group known as the Fireside Poets. Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, then part of Massachusetts, and studied at Bowdoin College. After spending time in Europe he became a professor at Bowdoin and, later, at Harvard College. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Longfellow retired from teaching in 1854 to focus on his writing, living the remainder of his life in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in a former headquarters of George Washington. Longfellow predominantly wrote lyric poems which are known for their musicality and which often presented stories of mythology and legend. He became the most popular American poet of his day and also had success overseas. He has been criticized, however, for imitating European styles and writing specifically for the masses.

--Word of the Day: voluptuary \vuh-LUHP-choo-er-ee\, (noun):
1. A person devoted to luxury and the gratification of sensual appetites; a sensualist.
(adjective):
1. Of, pertaining to, or characterized by preoccupation with luxury and sensual pleasure.
Quote:
Colette used to begin her day's writing by first picking fleas from her cat, and it's not hard to imagine how the methodical stroking and probing into fur might have focused such a voluptuary's mind.
-Diane Ackerman, "O Muse! You Do Make Things Difficult!", New York Times, November 12, 1989

--Quote of the Day: Any healthy man can go without food for two days - but not without poetry.
-Charles Baudelaire

--Spanish Word of the Day: desgracia, (noun):
misfortune, bad luck
(eg) Es una desgracia que haya* tenido que abandonar el Tour de esta manera.
(transl) It’s bad luck that he’s had to drop out of the Tour like this.
(eg) Se apenó de la desgracia de su compatriota.
(transl) He was saddened by his compatriot’s misfortune.

Coffee Table Poetry for Tea Drinkers is updated often. The easiest way to get your regular poetic inspiration is to subscribe by selecting E-mail or RSS Reader. Also, come follow us on Twitter. We look forward to making every day memorably intriguing for you.

Submit a poem on Coffee Table Poetry's GUEST BOOK FOR POETS

Coffee Table Poetry's Guest Book

Choose awesome apps on Cool iPhone Apps Free To $5 Caps

Cool iPhone Apps Free to $5 Caps

Posted by V. Mahfood
Pin It

0 comments:

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Subscribe RSS

coffee128

*Your AD or LINK

~ Place your site link or ad here!






Labels

 

Copyright ©2008-2012 Coffee Table Poetry For Tea Drinkers by V. Mahfood

Copyright © 2008-2010 Green Scrapbook Diary Designed by SimplyWP | Made free by Scrapbooking Software | Bloggerized by Ipiet Notez